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October 2017

IHC Open House

October 5, 2017 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

You are invited to the IHC’s Open House on Thursday, October 5, from 4-6 pm. Cosponsored by the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center and the Division of Humanities and Fine Arts. Meet new Humanities faculty, IHC fellows, and staff members. Learn about Crossings + Boundaries, our 2017-2018 public events series. Find out about our community-engagement programs and our numerous funding resources for faculty and graduate students. Explore our new lending library. Enjoy good food, drink, and conversation.

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RECEPTION: IHC Platform Gallery Exhibition Opening Reception

October 18, 2017 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Originating from the French word plateforme, meaning ‘ground plan’ or ‘flat shape’, the Platform Gallery is a public exhibition space at the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center, UCSB, that features the work of emerging artists displayed as two-dimensional printed media. The complete Platform exhibition archive is available online. The 2017–18 Platform exhibition engages with the IHC’s public events series theme, Crossings + Boundaries, which considers diverse experiences and phenomena of boundary crossing—institutional, political, cultural, artistic, gendered, psychological, and more.  The artwork displayed in the Platform exhibition gallery brings the IHC’s academic and community guests into dialogue with Crossings + Boundaries in creative ways. Join us as we celebrate the opening of the IHC Platform Gallery Exhibition, which features artists Alexis Crashaw, Maya T. Garabedian, Brent Gibbs, Lucy Holtsnider, Elisa Ortega Montilla, Sunny Samuel, Natasha Sarkar, and F. Myles Sciotto.

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INAUGURAL PANEL: Interdisciplinary Crossings + Boundaries

October 19, 2017 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

In this inaugural event for the IHC's Crossings + Boundaries public events series, four UCSB faculty members will discuss their varied experiences as interdisciplinary scholars, followed by a reception.   Beth DePalma Digeser (History, UCSB) studies the intersection of religion and philosophy with Roman politics, as well as the procession of “conversion” in Late Antiquity. Her latest book, A Threat to Public Piety: Christians, Platonists, and the Great Persecution (Cornell 2012), explores the interactions of Platonist philosophers and Christian theologians in the period leading up to the Great Persecution of AD 303-11. Her new research explores the questions surrounding the emperor Constantine’s move to become sole emperor. Why was his grasp of the West and the Balkans stable enough to allow him to move east (even though the Gallic empire had been a breakaway regime)? To what extent can the material…

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Talk: Interstellar Crossings: The Image of Exoplanets and the Imagination of Other Worlds
Lisa Messeri

October 26, 2017 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

When seven rocky planets were discovered around the star TRAPPIST-1, claims of potentially habitable worlds animated the scientific discourse and press coverage. Beautiful animations of the surfaces of these planets and imaginative tales of planet hopping suggested that this discovery was not just about discovering more planets, but that it was also about discovering worlds. In this talk, Messeri will recount ethnographic findings from her work with exoplanet astronomers. She will explore how planets become worlds and what resources scientists draw on to execute this conceptual crossing and imaginatively leave the boundary of our world to extend human presence beyond the solar system.

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November 2017

CONFERENCE: The Humanities in the Community: 2017 Convening of the Western Humanities Alliance

November 2, 2017 @ 10:30 am - November 3, 2017 @ 3:30 pm

What is the significance and power of community in the 21st century? How has community been conceptualized and created by different cultures throughout history? How are relationships between specific communities and the broader social milieu constructed and maintained? In today’s global society, what provides the impetus for a life of civic engagement, built upon democratic values, goals, and aspirations? Is the “network” the latest form of community, now disconnected from the preconditions of shared physical or social space? These and other questions will be explored in the 2017 convening of the Western Humanities Alliance.

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January 2018

Crossings+Boundaries TALK: Opening the Gates of Heaven: Religious and Philosophical Implications of Space Exploration
Michael Waltemathe

January 11, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Religion and philosophy have always been present in human space exploration, in the form of religious rituals practiced during space missions, placement of sacred objects in space, and astronauts’ descriptions of transcendental changes in perspective when looking back on Earth. Space exploration also poses ethical, religious, and philosophical challenges. How, for example, do we protect other celestial bodies from contamination by human space exploration? How do we protect the Earth from contamination by extraterrestrial samples brought back on spaceships? How will human society be represented to extraterrestrial beings? What are the wide-ranging implications of finding life in the universe? In his talk, Waltemathe will discuss these issues, exploring questions that seem to belong to the realm of science fiction while focusing on scientifically plausible exploration scenarios. Michael Waltemathe is senior lecturer in the Department of Protestant Theology at Ruhr-University Bochum…

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February 2018

Crossings+Boundaries TALK: Dreamland: America’s Opiate Epidemic and How We Got Here
Sam Quinones

February 1, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Click here to read an article about Quinones' talk. Quinones will discuss the origins of our nationwide opioid epidemic: pharmaceutical marketing, changes in our heroin market, and new attitudes toward pain among American healthcare consumers. He will also discuss cultural shifts that made this epidemic possible. Sam Quinones is a Los Angeles-based freelance journalist and author of three books of narrative nonfiction. His book Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic won a National Book Critics Circle award for the Best Nonfiction Book of 2015. He has reported on immigration, gangs, drug trafficking, and the border as a reporter for the L.A. Times (2004–2014) and as a freelance writer in Mexico (1994–2004). Sponsored by the IHC's Crossings + Boundaries series, the Walter H. Capps Center for the Study of Ethics, Religion, and Public Life, and the IHC's Idee Levitan Endowment.

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Crossings + Boundaries Talks: Sayak Valencia and Lorena Wolffer

February 8, 2018 @ 3:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Talk: From Queer to Cuir: Geopolitical Ostranenie from the Global South Sayak Valencia’s talk will explore the politics of survival and the alliances of the trans/border/messtizx/sissy/lesbian/dressed/slut-fag/cripple. The word “cuir” represents a defamiliarization—or ostranenie—of “queer,” which challenges automatic reading and registers, through its unfamiliarity, a geopolitical inflection southward and from the peripheries. Countering colonial epistemology and Anglo-American historiography, cuir invokes a space of decolonialized enunciation, at once playful and critical. Sayak Valencia (Cultural Studies, El Colegio de la Frontera Norte) is the author of Capitalismo Gore. Talk: Citizen Affects/Afectxs ciudadanxs Lorena Wolffer will discuss her experiences producing Citizen Affects/Afectxs ciudadanxs at UC Santa Barbara and at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) in Mexico City in 2017. This participatory cultural interventions project is focused on the affects that cross, regulate, and define women, queer, and non-normative individuals in our interaction with others…

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Crossings + Boundaries Talk: Exodus: The Largest Movement of People Since the Second World War
Dexter Filkins

February 28, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Corwin Pavilion, 494 UCEN Rd

The world is witnessing the greatest mass migration since 1945. More than sixty-five million people, about one in every hundred on Earth, have fled their homes. Some are internally displaced; others are refugees who have moved to multiple countries. This talk will discuss the three main causes of this giant human tide: the implosion of the Middle East following the Arab Spring; climate change, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, where drought and advancing deserts are pushing people to abandon their homes; and famine, because of which at least twenty million people are currently at risk of starvation, most of them in Nigeria, South Sudan, Yemen, and Somalia. In his talk, Filkins will take the audience on a tour of these places and discuss ways to address the complex causes of mass migration. Filkins has been a staff writer with The New Yorker since…

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March 2018

Crossings + Boundaries Talk: Murder and Mattering in Harambe’s House
Claire Jean Kim

March 6, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Date change to Tuesday, March 6th at 4:00PM. This talk approaches the controversy over the killing of the gorilla Harambe in the Cincinnati Zoo in May 2016 as a unique window onto the making of animalness and blackness in the contemporary U.S.  It will explore the notion of a racial-zoological order in which the “human” is constructed simultaneously in relation to both the “black” and the “animal.” Claire Jean Kim is Professor of Political Science and Asian American Studies at University of California, Irvine.  She is the author of Bitter Fruit: The Politics of Black-Korean Conflict in New York City (2000) and Dangerous Crossings: Race, Species, and Nature in a Multicultural Age (2015), both of which won book awards from the American Political Science Association. Sponsored by the IHC’s Crossings + Boundaries series and the Sara Miller McCune and George…

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April 2018

Crossings + Boundaries Reading: Of Great Importance
Nachoem M. Wijnberg

April 12, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Wijnberg Poetry Reading

The poems in Of Great Importance discuss taxes and debts, stocks and flows, citizenship and labor contracts, notaries and accountants, factories and strikes, freedoms and fundamental rights, how to make money and how to win elections, when to declare war and when to found a new state. The collection has been called “a painfully consistent and uncomfortably accurate analysis of power, economic and social structures and mechanisms which are at the root of the degenerate world in which we wake up each morning.” The poems look at history in order to learn something from it and build upon the best work of thinkers and poets such as Marx, Keynes, Heine, Miłosz, and especially Kaváfis. Nachoem M. Wijnberg is a Dutch poet and novelist who has been acclaimed as one of the foremost Dutch authors of the last decennia. His poetry has received many Dutch and Belgian awards,…

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Symposium: Humanities in Prison

April 26, 2018 @ 9:00 am - 5:30 pm
Humanities in Prison

Why study the humanities in prison? Why teach them?  What is the value of prison humanities programs for communities both inside and outside of prisons?  What humanistic texts and skills do we teach? This day-long symposium, hosted by the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center of the University of California, Santa Barbara, will explore the building of intellectual communities across systemic divides through the humanities. The symposium will include the voices of educators and formerly incarcerated individuals and will be of interest to those involved in public humanities, social justice, transformative pedagogy and civic engagement. Sponsored by the IHC’s Crossings + Boundaries series and the Hester and Cedric Crowell Endowment; the College of Letters & Science Critical Issues in America series, Changing Faces of U.S. Citizenship; and the Walter H. Capps Center for the Study of Ethics, Religion, and Public Life Schedule 9:00–10:45      Introductory…

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May 2018

Crossings + Boundaries Talk: Borderwall as Architecture
Ronald Rael

May 3, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Ronald Rael’s talk will reexamine what the 650 miles of physical barrier dividing the US and Mexico is and could be, suggesting that the wall is an opportunity for economic and social development along the border that encourages its conceptual and physical dismantling. Rael will illuminate the transformative effects of the wall on people, animals, and the natural and built landscape through the story of people on both sides of the border who transform and creatively challenge the wall’s existence. He will also discuss his architectural studio’s counterproposals that reimagine, hyperbolize, or question the wall and its construction, cost, performance, and meaning. Rael proposes that despite the intended use of the wall, which is to keep people out and away, the wall is instead an attractor, engaging both sides in a common dialogue. Ronald Rael is the Eva Li Memorial Chair…

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Crossings + Boundaries TALKS: Sinan Antoon and Sara Pursley
Sinan Antoon and Sara Pursley

May 10, 2018 @ 1:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Talk: The Times of Revolution in Jawad Salim’s Monument to Freedom The Iraqi artist Jawad Salim’s famous Monument to Freedom, which still stands in Baghdad’s Liberation Square, is usually read as a linear historical narrative of the Iraqi nationalist movement and the 1958 revolution it produced. Pursley’s talk explores heterogeneous conceptions of time in the work, including depictions of cyclical forms of temporality that reference Khaldunian historical time, Shi`i messianic time, and the time of mourning. She suggests that these forms of time do not work against promises of radical change in the monument, but, on the contrary, give such promises more imaginative purchase than they typically achieve in linear modernization narratives, with their tendency to open onto a singular and static future. Sara Pursley is Assistant Professor in Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies at New York University. Talk: Pre-occupation, Epistemic Violence,…

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October 2018

IHC Open House

October 4, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

You are invited to the IHC’s Open House on Thursday, October 4, from 4-6 pm. Cosponsored by the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center and the Division of Humanities and Fine Arts. Meet new Humanities faculty, IHC fellows, and staff members. Learn about Social Securities, our 2018-2019 public events series. Find out about our community-engagement programs and our numerous funding resources for faculty and graduate students. Enjoy good food, drink, and conversation.

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Social Securities Inaugural Lecture: Social Insecurities: Media Policy and the Fight for Digital Liberties
Jennifer Holt

October 11, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

In the US, media policy is designed to protect a host of cultural values, particularly those promoting the public interest and freedom of expression. This talk will explore how these values and their attendant “social securities” have been actively sabotaged by the regulators charged with preserving them, threatening everything from our individual privacy to democracy itself. In such a dire landscape, the humanities offer much needed direction toward reclaiming a brighter future. A reception will follow. Jennifer Holt is Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies. She is the author of Empires of Entertainment and co-editor of Distribution Revolution; Connected Viewing; and Media Industries: History, Theory, Method. She is a former Director of the Carsey-Wolf Center’s Media Industries Project and a Fellow at the Center for Democracy & Technology in Washington, D.C.  Sponsored by the IHC’s Social Securities series Image…

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Social Securities Talk: Resistance Behind Bars: The Struggles of Incarcerated Women
Victoria Law

October 18, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Since 1980, the population of female prisoners has increased eightfold in this country, with women of color disproportionately impacted. In her talk, Ms. Law will examine the structural inequities and injustices behind the rise in the number of incarcerated women and the recurring violation of rights women face inside prison, including lack of access to reproductive and medical health care and pervasive sexual harassment and abuse. Law will also discuss how incarcerated women are challenging and organizing against prison conditions and suggest ways that people on the outside can support their actions and resistance. Victoria Law is a freelance writer and editor. She is the author of Resistance Behind Bars: The Struggles of Incarcerated Women, which won the 2009 PASS (Prevention for a Safer Society) award. She frequently writes and speaks about the intersections between mass incarceration, gender and resistance. Sponsored by…

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November 2018

Social Securities Talk: Money is No Object: Aesthetics, Abstraction, and the Politics of Care
Scott Ferguson

November 15, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

In his talk, Scott Ferguson will rethink the historical relationship between money and aesthetics in an effort to broaden the politics of care using the alternative conception of money articulated by the contemporary heterodox school of Modern Monetary Theory (MMT). Mobilizing MMT, Ferguson critiques exhausted dialectical oppositions between money and art and contends that monetary abstraction, rather than representing a private, finite, and alienating technology, is instead a public and fundamentally unlimited medium that harbors still unrealized powers for inclusion and cultivation. A reception will follow. Scott Ferguson is Associate Professor of Film and New Media Studies in the Department of Humanities and Cultural Studies at the University of South Florida. He is the author of Dependence: Money, Aesthetics & the Politics of Care (2018) and Co-Director of The Modern Money Network Humanities Division, co-host of the Money on the…

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January 2019

Social Securities Talk: Embracing Shari’a: Women, Law, and Activism in Somalia
Mark Fathi Massoud

January 17, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Gender equality is a key principle of human rights and political security. But how are gender equality and human security ensured in societies struggling with legacies of civil war and political violence? This lecture reveals how, in a country where many observers presume law and security are absent, women are turning to Islam’s foundational sources—the Qur’an and the Hadith—to promote women’s rights and human and political security.  A reception will follow. Mark Fathi Massoud is Associate Professor of Politics and Legal Studies at UC Santa Cruz and the author of Law’s Fragile State: Colonial, Authoritarian, and Humanitarian Legacies in Sudan. Sponsored by the IHC's Social Securities series and the Walter H. Capps Center for the Study of Ethics, Religion, and Public Life

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Social Securities Talk: Why Can’t Feminists Change the Law? The History and Politics of Welfare Reform in the Modern U.S.
Felicia Kornbluh

January 24, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

In her talk, Kornbluh will reveal how welfare reform is shaped by “intersectional sexism,” the gendered and racialized dimensions of legal activity that are evident, persistent, yet ignored by mainstream policy makers and Washington, D.C.-based intellectuals. Taking as her example the failed passage of a feminist welfare reauthorization bill in the early 2000s, Kornbluh will discuss why the Democratic Party resisted embracing this initiative and explore the crucial role feminist scholars and activists have to play in understanding the details of policy and law in the intersectional context of gender, race, poverty, and inequality.  A reception will follow. Felicia Kornbluh is Associate Professor of History and Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies at the University of Vermont.  She is the author of The Battle for Welfare Rights: Poverty and Politics in Modern America (2007) and, with Gwendolyn Mink, Ensuring Poverty: Welfare Reform in Feminist Perspective (2018).…

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Social Securities Talk: Shaping Community Futures Through Policy + Architecture
Elizabeth Timme

January 31, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

LA-Más is a Los Angeles urban design non-profit focused on empowering lower-income and working class families who struggle to find affordable homes to rent or for whom walking is a primary mode of transportation. This talk will explore the architectural projects of LA-Más that provide accessible affordable housing and support the pedestrian right of way, and that, in doing so, create built environments that address the city’s social instability. Elizabeth Timme is Co-Founder and Co-Executive Director of LA-Más, a non-profit urban design organization based in Los Angeles that helps lower-income and underserved communities shape their future through policy and architecture. Timme teaches at Woodbury University’s School of Architecture and serves on the Zoning Advisory Committee of Re:Code LA, a city-led effort to transform the city’s outdated zoning code. She holds a master’s degree in architecture from Harvard’s Graduate School of Design and…

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February 2019

Social Securities Talk: Teaching the People: Enlightenment and the American Republic
David Marshall

February 21, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

In this talk, David Marshall will illuminate contemporary debates about the value of the liberal arts and sciences and public investment in higher education by examining Enlightenment arguments for both liberal education and public education in the early American Republic, and the 19th-century Land Grant movement, which resulted in the establishment of the University of California as a “public trust” in the California State Constitution. These two Enlightenment moments resonate today as we try to make the case for accessibility, the liberal arts, and the public research university in the face of privatization and pressure to focus on vocational and pre-professional training, and applied research. David Marshall is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at UC Santa Barbara, where he serves as Executive Vice Chancellor.  His research focuses on eighteenth-century fiction, aesthetics, and moral philosophy. Past President of the National…

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Social Securities Talk: Environmental Justice as Freedom
Julie Sze

February 28, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

This talk argues that environmental justice movements are freedom struggles. Beginning with the starting point that unjust environments are rooted in racism, capitalism, militarism, colonialism, land theft from Native peoples, and gender violence, the talk frames environmental justice as particularly significant in the moment of danger that we are currently facing. It is drawn from a forthcoming book that examines activism at Standing Rock, in Flint and the Central Valley, and in the wake of Hurricanes Katrina and Maria. Julie Sze is Professor of American Studies at UC Davis. She is also the founding director of the Environmental Justice Project for UC Davis’ John Muir Institute for the Environment. Sze's research investigates environmental justice and environmental inequality; culture and environment; race, gender and power; and urban/community health and activism. Sponsored by the IHC’s Social Securities series and the Harry Girvetz Memorial Endowment

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May 2019

2019 Arthur N. Rupe Great Debate: Immigration: A Boon or Burden to U.S. Society?
Rubén G. Rumbaut, Mark Krikorian, Donald M. Kerwin, Jr.

May 2, 2019 @ 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm
Campbell Hall, Building 538, University of California, Santa Barbara, Mesa Rd,

Thursday, May 2, 2019 / 7:30 PM Participants: Rubén G. Rumbaut Mark Krikorian Moderator: Donald M. Kerwin, Jr. UCSB Campbell Hall FREE Experts on immigration, national security and refugee movements will engage in a debate about the U.S. immigration system, the values and interests it serves and the impact of immigration on the nation. Mark Krikorian, Executive Director of the Center for Immigration Studies, is the co-author of Open Immigration: Yea & Nay and the author of The New Case against Immigration, Both Legal and Illegal and How Obama is Transforming America through Immigration. Rubén G. Rumbaut, Distinguished Professor of Sociology at UC Irvine, is the author of Immigrant America: A Portrait and Legacies: The Story of the Immigrant Second Generation. The debate will be moderated by Donald M. Kerwin, Jr., Director of the Center for Migration Studies of New York. Co-presented…

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Reading: UC Santa Barbara Student Veteran Writers

May 30, 2019 @ 11:45 am - 1:00 pm

Read the student veterans' stories in The Santa Barbara Independent. Nine student veterans will read stories about their military experiences.  Following the reading there will be time for questions from the audience. Gio Caballaro | Bradley Fry | John Lucero | Adrian Mejia | Andy Molina-Ochoa | Scott Rothdeutsch | Edward Rutherford | Kyle Shipe | Melissa Weidner Lunch will be provided. Sponsored by the IHC’s Social Securities series and the UC Santa Barbara Veterans Writing Workshop.

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Symposium and Staged Readings: The Hungry Woman: A Mexican Medea

May 31, 2019 @ 7:30 pm - June 1, 2019 @ 9:30 pm

Cherríe Moraga’s play, The Hungry Woman: A Mexican Medea (1995), depicts a dystopic future in a fractured América, aggravated by an entrenched patriarchy. It also explores the tenets of the movement that founded what are now thriving Chicana/Latina programs throughout the Southwest, including the UCSB Chicano Studies program, which celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2019. This symposium will present a timely (re)consideration of a movement in progress, alongside two staged readings of the play. Friday, May 31, 7:30 PM | Multicultural Center Theater, UCSB Staged reading of The Hungry Woman by a professional Los Angeles cast and UCSB community members, followed by a discussion with the playwright. Saturday, June 1, 1:00 PM | McCune Conference Room, 6020 HSSB 1:00 P.M. Opening and Welcome 1:15 P.M. "The Making of The Hungry Woman" - Playwright, Cherríe Moraga (Department of English) presents on…

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October 2019

IHC Open House

October 3, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

You are invited to the IHC’s Open House on Thursday, October 3, from 4-6 pm. Cosponsored by the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center and the Division of Humanities and Fine Arts. Meet new Humanities faculty, IHC fellows, and staff members. Learn about Critical Mass, our 2019-2020 public events series. Find out about our community-engagement programs and our numerous funding resources for faculty and graduate students. Enjoy good food, drink, and conversation.

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Critical Mass Inaugural Lecture: Plastic’s Tipping Point
Roland Geyer

October 10, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Plastic production, use, and pollution have been growing steadily for decades, without much public comment or concern. But suddenly, and very recently, there has been strong and widespread backlash against the pervasiveness of plastic. What prompted this sudden change in public opinion?  Did plastic pollution itself reach a tipping point?  Or did public attitudes toward this pollutant undergo a radical shift? Roland Geyer will discuss the history of global plastic production and disposal and will consider the future of both plastic and public outrage against its environmental impact. A reception will follow. Roland Geyer is a Professor at the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at UCSB. In his research he uses the approaches and methods of industrial ecology, such as life cycle assessment and material flow analysis, to assess pollution prevention strategies based on reuse, recycling, and material…

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Public Forum: Building a Green New Deal: Community, Coalition, and Organizing for Environmental Justice

October 24, 2019 @ 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

In communities, classrooms, and protest sites across the country, people have embraced the call for a Green New Deal as a way of recognizing that climate change presents us with an unprecedented historic challenge—and the need for comprehensive and transformational reform. California’s Central Coast has a powerful tradition of grassroots activism to draw on in rising to the challenge, from the wide-ranging environmental movement sparked by the 1969 Santa Barbara oil spill to the multi-racial labor, immigrant, and indigenous people’s rights organizations leading the struggle for economic justice region-wide. Together, these and allied organizations have formed the Central Coast Climate Justice Network, a regional coalition dedicated to developing a collective vision and coalitional strategy for achieving holistic and intersectional environmental justice in our region. Featuring presentations from Network member organizations, the aim of the forum is to launch a broad,…

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November 2019

Screening and Panel Discussion: Surviving Home

November 12, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

SURVIVING HOME is an intimate documentary that follows four U.S. military veterans from different generations over an eight year period as they rebuild their lives after war. Interwoven with veterans' voices from across the country, their unique paths of healing and transformation shed light on longterm consequences of war and raise questions about the roots of war and societal cycles of violence. A severely injured Iraq War veteran discovers a new voice that helps heal his wounds of war, as he and his wife struggle to keep their marriage alive. A Vietnam War veteran becomes a Buddhist monk in an effort to come to terms with the carnage and dehumanization of combat. A female Iraq War veteran fights through the effects of Military Sexual Trauma to take on the U.S. government in a class action lawsuit that could improve the…

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Critical Mass Talk: Ady Barkan: Love and Death, Hope and Resistance
Ady Barkan

November 21, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Sitting in that hotel armchair, I realized that my deadly disease was giving me newfound power at the very moment it was depriving me of so much strength. My voice was growing softer, but I was being heard by more people than ever before. My legs were disintegrating, but more and more people were following in my footsteps. Precisely because my days were numbered, people drew inspiration from my decision to spend them in resistance. Precisely because I faced such obstacles, my comrades were moved by my message that struggle is never futile. In this talk, the paralyzed political activist Ady Barkan will explore the existential questions that he has faced in the wake of his terminal diagnosis with ALS, and that the American people have faced under the Trump administration: What kind of life will our children have, and…

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