Archive

Loading Events

Upcoming Events

Events Search and Views Navigation

Event Views Navigation

December 2019

Magic Lantern Films Presents: Once Upon a Time in…Hollywood

December 6, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Once Upon a Time in...Hollywood at 7:00 and 10:00 PM

Find out more »

IV Live Presents Improvability: Naughty/Nice Show

December 6, 2019 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

IV Live Presents Improvability: Naughty/Nice Show Friday, December 6th at 8:00 PM Embarcadero Hall, Isla Vista $3 Admission Sponsored by IV Live, Isla Vista Arts, UCSB, and Associated Students

Find out more »

Performance: Lucinda y las Flores de la Nochebuena (UCSB Opera performance)
UCSB Opera Outreach Program, directed by Associate Professor Dr. Isabel Bayrakdarian

December 8, 2019 @ 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Karl Geiringer Hall, Building 531, University of California, Santa Barbara

UCSB Associate Professor Isabel Bayrakdarian will direct undergraduate students from UCSB’s Opera Outreach Program in a free community performance of Evan Mack’s 2016 children’s opera Lucinda y las Flores de la Nochebuena on Sunday, December 8, 2019 at 6 pm in Karl Geiringer Hall on the UC Santa Barbara campus. The 45-minute one-act opera is based on the Mexican folk tale of the same name that tells the story of how the poinsettia became a meaningful symbol of the holiday season. This project is supported by the UCSB Interdisciplinary Humanities Center (IHC) Collaborative Arts Teaching Program Award and cosponsored by UC Santa Barbara Department of Music

Find out more »

Talk: The Emotional Landscape of Revolution: Russia 1905-1925
Mark D. Steinberg

December 16, 2019 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

In this talk, I consider the shifting, tumultuous, and consequential field of emotions that contemporaries perceived as defining public life in Russia during its “revolutionary” age. I take this story from the stillborn revolution of 1905, into global war and transnational revolution, through a bloody civil war into the first years of peaceful “socialist construction.” Often categorized as “the public mood,” a trope in Russian journalism and politics in the first half of the 20th century, these emotions ranged from what was described as dark anguish to joyful enthusiasm. Texts to be considered include working-class poetry, public art, appeals, petitions, and memoirs. Topics range from street protests to efforts to create liberated new men and women, including sexually. Key elements woven into this story of revolution and feeling include religion, violence, and language. I link all of these stories and…

Find out more »

January 2020

Information Sessions: Public Humanities Graduate Fellows Program

January 9, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Thursday, January 9, 4:00-5:00 PM | 6020 HSSB Thursday, January 16, 9:00-10:00 AM | 6020 HSSB Join the IHC and current Public Humanities Fellows to learn more about the Public Humanities Graduate Fellows Program.  Explore the course requirements, hear about paid internship and fellow-designed community project opportunities, and find out more about the capstone project. Light refreshments will be served.

Find out more »

Critical Mass Talk: Nations in Crisis, People in Crisis: Connecting Upheaval
Jared Diamond

January 15, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Corwin Pavilion, 494 UCEN Rd

Nations that successfully navigate crises do so by making selective changes to their identities and actions. When individuals experience crises—mid-life, financial, health, relationship—they may also adopt selective changes to overcome the situation. But some individuals, like some nations, are better at navigating upheaval than others. By drawing on the factors that counselors and psychotherapists have identified that affect the likelihood of overcoming personal crisis, Diamond will examine the extent to which crisis response on the individual scale helps us to understand the outcomes of recent and impending national and world crises. Jared Diamond is professor of Geography at UCLA and the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Guns, Germs, and Steel, Collapse, and other books. Copies of Diamond's books will be available for purchase and signing. Sponsored by the IHC’s Critical Mass series Image: Kinuko Y. Craft

Find out more »

Information Sessions: Public Humanities Graduate Fellows Program

January 16, 2020 @ 9:00 am - 10:00 am

Thursday, January 9, 4:00-5:00 PM | 6020 HSSB Thursday, January 16, 9:00-10:00 AM | 6020 HSSB Join the IHC and current Public Humanities Fellows to learn more about the Public Humanities Graduate Fellows Program.  Explore the course requirements, hear about paid internship and fellow-designed community project opportunities, and find out more about the capstone project. Light refreshments will be served.

Find out more »

Humanities Decanted: Queering Black Atlantic Religions: Transcorporeality in Candomblé, Santería, and Vodou
Roberto Strongman

January 30, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Join us for a dialogue between Roberto Strongman (Black Studies) and Jennifer Tyburczy (Feminist Studies) about Strongman’s new book, Queering Black Atlantic Religions: Transcorporeality in Candomblé, Santería, and Vodou. Refreshments will be served. In Queering Black Atlantic Religions, Roberto Strongman examines Haitian Vodou, Cuban Lucumí/Santería, and Brazilian Candomblé to demonstrate how religious rituals of trance possession allow humans to understand themselves as embodiments of the divine. In these rituals, the commingling of humans and the divine produces gender identities that are independent of biological sex. As opposed to the Cartesian view of the spirit as locked within the body, the body in Afro-diasporic religions is an open receptacle. Showing how trance possession is a primary aspect of almost all Afro-diasporic cultural production, Strongman articulates transcorporeality as a black, trans-Atlantic understanding of the human psyche, soul, and gender as multiple, removable, and…

Find out more »

March 2020

Humanities Decanted: Transgenerational Remembrance: Performance and the Asia-Pacific War in Contemporary Japan
Jessica Nakamura

March 5, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Jessica Nakamura

Join us for a dialogue between Jessica Nakamura (Theater and Dance) and Catherine Nesci (French and Italian, Comparative Literature) about Nakamura’s new book, Transgenerational Remembrance: Performance and the Asia-Pacific War in Contemporary Japan. Refreshments will be served. In Transgenerational Remembrance, Jessica Nakamura investigates the role of artistic production in the commemoration and memorialization of the Asia-Pacific War (1931–1945) in Japan since 1989. During this time, survivors of Japanese aggression and imperialism, previously silent about their experiences, have sparked contentious public debates about the form and content of war memories. Working from theoretical frameworks of haunting and ethics, Nakamura develops an analytical lens based on the Noh theater ghost. Noh emphasizes the agency of the ghost and the dialogue between the dead and the living. Integrating her Noh-inflected analysis into ethical and transnational feminist queries, Nakamura shows that performances move remembrance beyond…

Find out more »

April 2020

Critical Mass Talks and Staged Reading: The Creative Edge of Collecting
William Davies King and Rebecca Falkoff

April 2, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 9:30 pm

4-6 pm - Talks: William Davies King and Rebecca Falkoff 8-9:30 pm - Staged Reading: Collections of Nothing Talk: The Creative Edge of Collecting William Davies King has spent a lifetime collecting nothing in a way he brought to light in his 2008 book Collections of Nothing. His collecting of such things as Cheez-It boxes, "Place Stamp Here" squares, hotel door cards, and the little stickers you find on fruit runs into the tens of thousands of items, all on the low edge of the valueless and the ephemeral. But he has also spent a lifetime engaged with the arts--drama, performance art, collage--and he has explored the ways the activity of the collector, who thinks through the world, connects to the work of the artist, who makes a world through things. Using exhibits, imagery, anecdotes, and ideas, he will open…

Find out more »

Critical Mass Talk: Notes on the Afterlife of Mass Incarceration
Reuben Jonathan Miller

April 16, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

While more people are incarcerated in the United States than in any other nation in the history of the western world, the prison is but one (comparatively) small part of a vast carceral landscape. The 600,000 people released each year join nearly 5 million people already on probation or parole, 12 million who are processed through a county jail, 19 million U.S. adults estimated to have a felony conviction, and the staggering 79 million Americans with a criminal record. But the size of the U.S. carceral state is second in consequence to its reach. Incarcerated people are greeted by more than 48,000 laws, policies and administrative sanctions upon release that limit their participation in the labor and housing markets, in the culture and civic life of the city, and even within their families. They are subject to rules other people…

Find out more »

Humanities Decanted: Antigone Rising: The Subversive Power of the Ancient Myths
Helen Morales

April 23, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Join us for a dialogue between Helen Morales (Classics) and Vilna Bashi-Treitler (Black Studies) about Morales’ new book, Antigone Rising: The Subversive Power of the Ancient Myths. Refreshments will be served. Helen Morales is a classicist and cultural critic with interests that include the ancient novel, Greek imperial poetry, mythology, literary criticism, sexual ethics, diversity, and pilgrimage. These interests are always connected to major contemporary concerns—leadership, class, race, sexual politics, aesthetics, law—a better understanding of which, in her view, comes through appreciating their investment in Classics. She is the author of Pilgrimage to Dollywood (2014), Classical Mythology: A Very Short Introduction (2007 and 2010), and Vision and Narrative in Achilles Tatius’ “Leucippe and Clitophon” (2004). She is also editor of the journal Ramus. Sponsored by the IHC’s Harry Girvetz Memorial Endowment

Find out more »

The 2020 Diana and Simon Raab Writer-in-Residence: Jesmyn Ward

April 29, 2020 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Corwin Pavilion, 494 UCEN Rd

MacArthur Genius and two-time National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward has been called “the new Toni Morrison” (American Booksellers Association). In 2017, she became the first woman and first person of color to win the National Book Award twice—joining the ranks of William Faulkner, Saul Bellow, John Cheever, Philip Roth, and John Updike. Her writing, which encompasses fiction, nonfiction, and memoir, is “raw, beautiful, and dangerous” (The New York Times Book Review). Ward’s novels, primarily set on Mississippi’s Gulf Coast, are deeply informed by the trauma of Hurricane Katrina. Salvage the Bones, winner of the 2011 National Book Award, is a troubling but ultimately empowering tale of familial bonds set amid the chaos of the hurricane. Ward’s memoir, Men We Reaped, deals with the loss of five young men in her life—to drugs, accidents, suicide, and the bad luck that follows people…

Find out more »

May 2020

Talk: Lilla Balint
Lilla Balint

May 5, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Lilla Balint is Assistant Professor of German in the Department of German at University of California, Berkeley. She specializes in twentieth- and twenty-first-century German literature, culture, and intellectual history in its broader comparative contexts. At UC Berkeley, she is affiliated with the Institute for European Studies and the Jewish Studies Program. Currently, she is at work on a book manuscript, “Ruins of Utopia: History, Memory, and the Novel after 1989,” that exposes the afterlife of socialism in contemporary literature. This comparative and multilingual study puts authors from Central Europe in dialogue to investigate how historical fiction after 1989 reconstructs the Cold War East. Located at the intersections of narrative poetics, cultural history, and memory studies, the book analyzes how novelists from diverse linguistic and cultural contexts re-envision Europe after the fall of the Berlin Wall. Sponsored by the UC Humanities…

Find out more »

Critical Mass Talk: Struggling to Save America’s Cities in the Suburban Age: Urban Renewal Revisited
Lizabeth Cohen

May 7, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Urban Renewal of the 1950s through 1970s has acquired a very poor reputation, much of it deserved. But reducing it to an unchanging story of urban destruction misses some important legacies and genuinely progressive goals. Those include efforts to create more socially mixed communities, to involve suburbs—not just cities--in solving metropolitan inequality, and most importantly, to hold the federal government responsible for funding more affordable housing and other urban investments, rather than turn to the private sector. Cohen will revisit this history by following the long career of Edward J. Logue, who worked to revitalize New Haven in the 1950s, became the architect of the “New Boston” in the 1960s, and later led innovative organizations in New York at the state level and in the South Bronx. She will analyze the evolution in Logue’s thinking and actions, when and how…

Find out more »
+ Export Events