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January 2021

Living Democracy Talk: Land Grab U: Land-Grant Universities and Indigenous Peoples
Tristan Ahtone and Robert Lee

January 22, 2021 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Land Grab U: Land-Grant Universities and Indigenous Peoples

REGISTER NOW Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed the Morrill Act, which distributed public domain lands to raise funds for fledgling colleges across the nation. The creation story told around this event is that land-grant universities were given the gift of free land. But the truth is much more complicated: The Morrill Act worked by turning land expropriated from tribal nations into seed money for higher education. In all, the act redistributed nearly 10.8 million acres from more than 250 tribal nations for the benefit of 52 colleges. Those lands, when grouped together, represent an area approximately the size of Denmark. Ahtone and Lee's presentation will both examine the land specifically used to found the University of California and also discuss the methods employed in this investigation of land

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February 2021

Living Democracy Talk: Strongmen: From Mussolini to Trump
Ruth Ben-Ghiat

February 11, 2021 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Strongmen: From Mussolini to Trump

REGISTER NOW Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link What do strongman leaders across a century have in common? Why do people continue to follow them, despite the destruction they cause? Drawing on her new book, Strongmen: Mussolini to the Present, Ruth Ben-Ghiat discusses the playbook of corruption, virility, propaganda, and violence they utilize, how people have resisted authoritarians over a century, and what we can do to strengthen democracy in America and around the world. Ruth Ben-Ghiat is Professor of History and Italian Studies at New York University. She writes frequently for CNN and other news and analysis sites on fascism, authoritarian leaders, propaganda, and threats to democracy around the world and how to counter them. Sponsored by the IHC’s Living Democracy series, the IHC’s Harry Girvetz Memorial Endowment, and the UCSB Italian Studies Program REGISTER NOW. ASL

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Living Democracy Talk: Halfway Home: Race, Punishment, and the Afterlife of Mass Incarceration
Reuben Jonathan Miller

February 25, 2021 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Reuben Miller Critical Mass Talk

REGISTER NOW Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link While more people are incarcerated in the United States than in any other nation in the history of the western world, the prison is but one (comparatively) small part of a vast carceral landscape. The 600,000 people released each year join nearly 5 million people already on probation or parole, 12 million who are processed through a county jail, 19 million U.S. adults estimated to have a felony conviction, and the staggering 79 million Americans with a criminal record. But the size of the U.S. carceral state is second in consequence to its reach. Incarcerated people are greeted by more than 48,000 laws, policies and administrative sanctions upon release that limit their participation in the labor and housing markets, in the culture and civic life of the

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May 2021

Living Democracy Talk: What We Can Do For Each Other: Wake Work in Our Times
Cristina Rivera Garza

May 6, 2021 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link One of the greatest threats against democracy and justice is indolence--defined as a form of militant indifference based on the lack of empathy for the suffering of others. Cristina Rivera Garza will explore how taking part in and contributing to transnational emotional communities, many of them based on shared experiences of social suffering and the grieving that comes with it, may help us leap out of ourselves and into the heart of the bond we share with human and non-human beings alike. Cristina Rivera Garza is Distinguished Professor of Hispanic Studies and Creative Writing and Director of the PhD in Creative Writing in Spanish Program at the University of Houston. She is an award-winning author, translator, and critic. Her recent publications include The Taiga Syndrome, translated by Suzanne Jill Levine and Aviva Kana

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