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April 2021

CANCELLED | Living Democracy Talk: Lessons of the Hour—Frederick Douglass
Isaac Julien and Mark Nash

April 16, 2021 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Lessons of the Hour—Frederick Douglass

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED Artist and filmmaker, Isaac Julien, and writer and curator, Mark Nash, will screen excerpts from Julien's film "Lessons of the Hour—Frederick Douglass" in a presentation that will explore the importance of looking to history and biography to articulate contemporary cultural movements. Isaac Julien's moving image practice draws from and comments on a range of artistic disciplines including film, theatre, photography and performance. Julien is a Distinguished Professor of the Arts and Nash is a Professor of Arts at UC Santa Cruz where they run the Isaac Julien Lab, a platform for the innovation of visual and sonic languages for production and the critical reception of moving image, video art, and installation work by examining historical and contemporary art practice. Sponsored by the IHC’s Living Democracy series and the Hester and Cedric Crowell Endowment Image: Isaac Julien,

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Research Focus Group Meeting: Embracing Ecological Uncertainty through Narrative
Marco Caracciolo

April 19, 2021 @ 10:00 am - 11:00 am

Uncertainty is a central psychological dimension of the ecological crisis. The science of climate change brings into view widely divergent scenarios; the discrepancy between these more or less catastrophic visions of the future undermines our ontological security (in Anthony Giddens’s terminology). Dr. Caracciolo argues that literary narrative has an important role to play in cultivating readers’ ability to live with uncertainty. He describes this process as a shift from a primarily negative understanding of uncertainty (as something to be avoided at all costs) to a more complex, nuanced appreciation. The presentation will be followed by a discussion moderated by Professor Sowon Park. The meeting is open to all but we do ask you to register to attend so that we can spend our time in the meeting as productively as possible. Please register by April 15. After you’ve registered, you will receive

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Humanities Decanted: Violentologies: Violence, Identity, and Ideology in Latina/o Literature
Ben Olguín

April 22, 2021 @ 4:00 pm - 4:45 pm

REGISTER NOW Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link Join us online for a dialogue between Ben Olguín (English, UCSB) and María Josefina Saldaña-Portillo (Social and Cultural Analysis, NYU) about Olguín’s new book, Violentologies: Violence, Identity, and Ideology in Latina/o Literature. Audience Q&A will follow. Violentologies: Violence, Identity, and Ideology in Latina/o Literature, explores how various forms of violence undergird a wide range of Latina/o subjectivities, or Latinidades, from 1835 to the present. Drawing upon the Colombian interdisciplinary field of violence studies known as violentología, which examines the transformation of Colombian society during a century of political and interpersonal violence, this book adapts the neologism "violentology" as a heuristic device and epistemic category to map the salience of violence in Latina/o history, life, and culture in the U.S. and globally. Based on one hundred primary texts

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Humanities Decanted: Race Characters: Ethnic Literature and the Figure of the American Dream
Swati Rana

April 29, 2021 @ 4:00 pm - 4:45 pm

REGISTER NOW Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link Join us online for a dialogue between Swati Rana (English) and Stephanie L. Batiste (English) about Rana’s new book, Race Characters: Ethnic Literature and the Figure of the American Dream. Audience Q&A will follow. A vexed figure inhabits U.S. literature and culture: the visibly racialized immigrant who disavows minority identity and embraces the American dream. Such figures are potent and controversial, for they promise to expiate racial violence and perpetuate an exceptionalist ideal of America. Swati Rana grapples with these figures, building on studies of literary character and racial form. Rana offers a new way to view characterization through racialization that creates a fuller social reading of race. Situated in a nascent period of ethnic identification from 1900 to 1960, this book focuses on immigrant writers who

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Conference: Fallout: Chernobyl and the Ecology of Disaster

April 30, 2021 @ 9:00 am - 4:00 pm

CONFERENCE REGISTRATION The interdisciplinary virtual conference “Fallout: Chernobyl and the Ecology of Disaster” will take place on Friday, April 30, 2021 at 9:00am-4:00pm, with an international slate of speakers representing a variety of disciplines who will share their insights on the 35th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster. Thirty-five years after the 1986 nuclear accident at Chernobyl, the interdisciplinary virtual conference Fallout: Chernobyl and the Ecology of Disaster considers its afterlife and reverberations in various disciplines, including culture and the arts. Situated at a watershed moment during the Cold War, Chernobyl has spawned an unprecedented quantity of global responses from scientists, writers, filmmakers, and artists, and it has become a key moment for the global environmental movement. This conference views the accident and its aftermath in the context of broader global ecologies of disaster and considers how catastrophe is coded and understood —

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May 2021

Living Democracy Talk: What We Can Do For Each Other
Cristina Rivera Garza

May 6, 2021 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
What We Can Do for Each Other: Wake Work in Our Times

REGISTER NOW Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link One of the greatest threats against democracy and justice is indolence--defined as a form of militant indifference based on the lack of empathy for the suffering of others. Cristina Rivera Garza will explore how taking part in and contributing to transnational emotional communities in Mexico and the U.S., many based on shared experiences of social suffering and the grieving that comes with it, may help us leap out of ourselves and into the heart of the bond we share with human and non-human beings alike. Audience Q&A will follow. Cristina Rivera Garza is Distinguished Professor of Hispanic Studies and Creative Writing and Director of the PhD in Creative Writing in Spanish Program at the University of Houston. She is an award-winning author, translator, and critic. Her recent publications include The Taiga

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2021 The Arthur N. Rupe Great Debate: Taming Titans: How Should We Regulate Big Tech?
Michael J. Burstein, Sonia Katyal, Kate Klonick, Randal C. Picker

May 18, 2021 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Rupe Debate

REGISTER NOW Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link Participants: Sonia Katyal, UC Berkeley School of Law Kate Klonick, St. John’s University School of Law Randal C. Picker, University of Chicago School of Law Moderator: Michael J. Burstein, Cardozo School of Law Experts on law and technology discuss how we should regulate Big Tech companies Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google, and Microsoft.  Sonia Katyal, Distinguished Haas Chair at UC Berkeley School of Law and Co-Director of the Berkeley Center for Law & Technology, has published widely on the intersection of technology, intellectual property, and civil rights (including antidiscrimination, privacy, and freedom of speech) as well as on law, gender, and sexuality. Kate Klonick, Assistant Professor of Law at St. John's University School of Law and Affiliate Fellow at the Information Society Project at Yale Law School, has

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Humanities Decanted: Plato and the Mythic Tradition in Political Thought
Tae-Yeoun Keum

May 20, 2021 @ 4:00 pm - 4:45 pm
Keum

REGISTER NOW Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link Join us online for a dialogue with Tae-Yeoun Keum (Political Science) about her new book, Plato and the Mythic Tradition in Political Thought. Audience Q&A will follow. Plato’s use of myths—the Myth of Metals, the Myth of Er—sits uneasily with his canonical reputation as the inventor of rational philosophy. Since the Enlightenment, interpreters like Hegel have sought to resolve this tension by treating Plato’s myths as mere regrettable embellishments, irrelevant to his main enterprise. Others, such as Karl Popper, have railed against the deceptive power of myth, concluding that a tradition built on Platonic foundations can be neither rational nor desirable. Tae-Yeoun Keum challenges the premise underlying both of these positions. She argues that myth is neither irrelevant nor inimical to the ideal of rational progress. She

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Reading: UC Santa Barbara Student Veteran Writers

May 27, 2021 @ 12:00 pm - 12:45 pm

REGISTER NOW Free to attend; registration required to receive Zoom webinar attendance link UC Santa Barbara student veterans will read stories about their military experiences, followed by audience Q&A. Sponsored by the IHC’s Living Democracy series and the UC Santa Barbara Veterans Writing Workshop REGISTER NOW

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