Events

Jan 14 Wed
Events TALK: An Almost Unknown Masterpiece: Cecco del Caravaggio’s “Resurrection” Michael Fried (History of Art, Johns Hopkins University)
Jan 15 Thu
Events TALK: Violence, Affect, and the Post-Traumatic Subject Ruth Leys (History, John Hopkins University)
Jan 15 Thu
The Anthropocene: Views from the Humanities Series SCREENING: Watermark (2013) Casey Walsh (Anthropology, UCSB)
Jan 22 Thu
The Anthropocene: Views from the Humanities Series ROUNDTABLE: Natural Capital
Jan 23 Fri
IHC's Machines People and Politics RFG The Assembly Line and American Labor David E. Nye (Center for American Studies, University of Southern Denmark)
Jan 26 Mon
IHC's Ancient Borderlands RFG TALK: Who is Carrying the Temple Menorah? A Jewish Counter-Narrative of the Arch of Titus Spolia Panel Steven Fine (History, Yeshiva University)
Jan 29 Thu
The Anthropocene: Views from the Humanities Series READING: On Streaming Allison Adelle Hedge Coke (poet, winner of the American Book Award)
Jan 30 Fri
Events TALK: Intellectual Property History as Labor History Catherine Fisk (University of California, Irvine School of Law)
Feb 4 Wed
Events TALK: Is Public Education Dead? David L. Kirp (James D. Marver Professor of Public Policy, UC Berkeley)
Feb 5 Thu
The Anthropocene: Views from the Humanities Series TALK: Drawing the End of our World: Comics, Climate Change and Pizzly Bears Andy Warner (comic artist)

(more upcoming events...)

2014-15 PUBLIC EVENTS SERIES

The Anthropocene:

News

Audio recordings of “Anthropocene” Talks Now available

Diana and Simon Raab Writer-in-Residence for 2015: Booker International Prize winner Lydia Davis

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Winter 2015 Course: INT 201GW Grant and Fellowship Writing for the Social Sciences, Arts, and Humanties

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Call for Papers: Approaching the Anthropocene: Perspectives from the Humanities and Fine Arts

Thursday-Friday, May 7-8, 2015
Abstract deadline: Monday, March 2, 2015
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Official Press Release for The Anthropocene Series

 The full press release can be read here.

High and Dry: On Deserts and ‘Crisis’

Dick Hebdige (Film & Media Studies & Studio Art, UCSB)
Thursday, December 4, 2014 / 4:00 PM
McCune Conference Room, 6020 HSSB
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Problems with the Anthropocene: A View from Rural Amazonia

Nicholas C. Kawa (Anthropology, Ball State University)
Friday, November 21, 2014 / 1:00 PM
McCune Conference Room, 6020 HSSB

In recognition of humanity’s increased capacity to alter the earth’s climate and bio-physical environment, the Nobel Prize-winning atmospheric chemist Paul Crutzen has declared that we now live in a new geological epoch: the Anthropocene. Ironically, Crutzen’s declaration occurs at a time when many scholars in the humanities and social sciences are concerned with the latent anthropocentrism that dominates much of modern thought. Drawing from ethnographic research in Brazilian Amazonia, this presentation actively questions the conceptual foundations of the Anthropocene and how it frames human history and human relationships to the environment. In doing so, it discusses some of the ways that rural Amazonians conceive of human-environmental relations, which can serve as valuable counterpoints to the views that undergird the Anthropocene.

Nicholas C. Kawa is an environmental anthropologist.  He received his PhD in Anthropology from the University of Florida in August 2011. His  research  focuses on issues of biodiversity management, agricultural sustainability, and long-term human-environmental interaction in Brazilian Amazonia. Currently, he is developing research in Indiana that examines farmers’ adoption of conservation management practices.

Click here to listen to a recording of Nick Kawa’s talk on Rural Amazonia for the IHC series The Anthropocene: Views from the Humanities.

Sponsored by  the Dept. of Anthropology and the IHC series The Anthropocene: Views from the Humanities.

 

Into the Bowels of the Anthropocene: Excrement and the Current Ecological Crisis

Nicholas C. Kawa (Anthropology, Ball State University)
Thursday, November 20, 2014 / 4:00 PM
McCune Conference Room, 6020 HSSB

The origins of the Anthropocene are typically traced to the Industrial Revolution, a period that led to drastic alteration of the Earth’s climate and bio-physical environment. However, another significant development occurred at the time, one that is overlooked by geologists and climate scientists: the widespread institution of the private flush toilet. With the ability to carry human excrement out of sight, the modern toilet has perpetuated the illusion that our waste can be made to disappear. This presentation discusses both the foundations and consequences of this modernist illusion, using contrasting examples from rural Amazonia and other parts of the world to explore alternative forms of human waste management.

Nicholas C. Kawa is an environmental anthropologist.  He received his PhD in Anthropology from the University of Florida in August 2011. His  research  focuses on issues of biodiversity management, agricultural sustainability, and long-term human-environmental interaction in Brazilian Amazonia. Currently, he is developing research in Indiana that examines farmers’ adoption of conservation management practices.

Click here to listen to a recording of Nick Kawa’s talk for the IHC series The Anthropocene: Views from the Humanities.

Sponsored by the IHC series The Anthropecene: View from the Humanities.

Charting a ‘Good’ Path in a Turbulent Age

Andrew Revkin (The New York Times)
Thursday, November 13, 2014 / 4:00 PM
McCune Conference Room, 6020 HSSB
(Please plan to arrive early; seating is limited.)

The environmental movement has long been built around two themes – “woe is me” and “shame on you.”  But in the age of global human influence, the Anthropocene, that approach ends up resembling a circular firing squad. Is the palm oil developer the villain, or the person buying the KitKat bar or “green” biodiesel fuel derived from palm nuts?  Andrew Revkin, building on more than 30 years of environmental reporting, outlines a fresh approach to fostering durable progress on a complex, turbulent planet — one focused less on unachievable goals and more on building the human capacity to produce positive environmental and social outcomes.

Revkin has been writing about environmental sustainability for more than three decades, from the Amazon to the White House to the North Pole, mainly for The New York Times. He has won the top awards in science journalism multiple times, along with a Guggenheim Fellowship. As the Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding at Pace University, he teaches courses in blogging, environmental communication and documentary film. He has written acclaimed books on global warming, the changing Arctic and the assault on the Amazon rain forest, as well as three book chapters on science communication. Drawing on his experience with his Times blog, Dot Earth, which Time magazine named one of the top 25 blogs in 2013, Revkin speaks to audiences around the world about the power of the Web to foster progress. He is also a performing songwriter, was a longtime accompanist for Pete Seeger and recently released his first album of original songs, which was hailed as a “tasty mix of roots goulash” on Jambands, an influential music website. Two films have been based on his work: “Rock Star” (Warner Brothers, 2001) and “The Burning Season” (HBO, 1994).

Click here to listen to a recording of Andrew Revkin’s talk for the IHC series The Anthropocene: Views from the Humanities.

Sponsored by the IHC’s  Sara Miller McCune and George D. McCune Endowment and IHC series The Anthropocene: Views from the Humanities.

The Anthropocene: A New Epoch of Thought?

Kathryn Yusoff (Human Geography, Queen Mary University of London)
Tuesday, November 4, 2014  / 4:00 PM
McCune Conference Room, 6020 HSSB

The Anthropocene is the informal geologic chronological term that serves as a material (and perhaps metaphysical) marker for human impacts on earth forces. While the Anthropocene might not be a proper name for this epoch, it does nominate a threshold moment that signals the demise of the stable environmental conditions of the Holocene that provided the context for Western thought. What this improper naming does open up, however, is a speculative dimension to environmental thought in both the sciences and humanities, and in doing so it reconfigures the relation between the two, provoking new articulations of environmental relations and its figures of thought (such as Nature and the Human). But what does this new epoch of thought demand from us? What politics and aesthetics are proper to this planetary event, this new epoch? And, how can the humanities give a critical extension and speculative explication of this geology?

Kathryn Yusoff is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Geography at Queen Mary University of London. Her interdisciplinary research focuses on political aesthetics, geophilosophy and environmental change (including climate change, extinction and the Anthropocene). She is currently writing a book about “Geologic Life” that examines the genealogies, geontologies and geopolitics of the Anthropocene.

Click here to listen to a recording of Kathryn Yusoff’s talk for the IHC series The Anthropocene: Views from the Humanities.

Sponsored by the IHC series The Anthropocene: Views from the Humanities.

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Interdisciplinary Humanities Center
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