Events

Loading Events
Find Events

Event Views Navigation

Past Events

Events List Navigation

October 2017

Baby Driver

October 13, 2017 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte

Magic Lantern screening of Baby Driver at 7 pm and 10 pm.

Find out more »

Improvability Disney Show

October 13, 2017 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3
Find out more »

Baby Driver

October 16, 2017 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte

Magic Lantern screening of Baby Driver at 7 pm and 10 pm.

Find out more »

RECEPTION: IHC Platform Gallery Exhibition Opening Reception

October 18, 2017 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Originating from the French word plateforme, meaning ‘ground plan’ or ‘flat shape’, the Platform Gallery is a public exhibition space at the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center, UCSB, that features the work of emerging artists displayed as two-dimensional printed media. The complete Platform exhibition archive is available online. The 2017–18 Platform exhibition engages with the IHC’s public events series theme, Crossings + Boundaries, which considers diverse experiences and phenomena of boundary crossing—institutional, political, cultural, artistic, gendered, psychological, and more.  The artwork displayed in the Platform exhibition gallery brings the IHC’s academic and community guests into dialogue with Crossings + Boundaries in creative ways. Join us as we celebrate the opening of the IHC Platform Gallery Exhibition, which features artists Alexis Crashaw, Maya T. Garabedian, Brent Gibbs, Lucy Holtsnider, Elisa Ortega Montilla, Sunny Samuel, Natasha Sarkar, and F. Myles Sciotto.

Find out more »

Finding Funding With COS Pivot

October 19, 2017 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
1301 SSMS, Social Sciences & Media Studies Building, UCSB

Learn how to use the COS Pivot funding search engine to find funding opportunities in your area of expertise.

Find out more »

INAUGURAL PANEL: Interdisciplinary Crossings + Boundaries

October 19, 2017 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

In this inaugural event for the IHC's Crossings + Boundaries public events series, four UCSB faculty members will discuss their varied experiences as interdisciplinary scholars, followed by a reception.   Beth DePalma Digeser (History, UCSB) studies the intersection of religion and philosophy with Roman politics, as well as the procession of “conversion” in Late Antiquity. Her latest book, A Threat to Public Piety: Christians, Platonists, and the Great Persecution (Cornell 2012), explores the interactions of Platonist philosophers and Christian theologians in the period leading up to the Great Persecution of AD 303-11. Her new research explores the questions surrounding the emperor Constantine’s move to become sole emperor. Why was his grasp of the West and the Balkans stable enough to allow him to move east (even though the Gallic empire had been a breakaway regime)? To what extent can the material…

Find out more »

TALK: Eating Vegan 101. Nutritional Benefits of a Plant-Based Diet

October 19, 2017 @ 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
1001 Life Sciences, Life Sciences Building, UCSB

Dr. Michael Klaper graduated from the University of Illinois College of Medicine in Chicago (1972), served a medical internship at Vancouver General Hospital in British Columbia, Canada with additional training in surgery, anesthesiology, and orthopedics at the University of British Columbia Hospitals in Vancouver and in obstetrics at the University of California Hospitals in San Francisco. As Dr. Klaper’s medical career progressed, he began to realize (true to what science is bearing out today) that many of the diseases his patients presented – clogged arteries (atherosclerosis), high blood pressure (hypertension), obesity, adult onset diabetes, and even some forms of arthritis, asthma, and other significant illnesses – were made worse or actually caused by the high sugar, high fat, high salt, overly processed Standard American Diet (S.A.D.). Accordingly, Dr. Klaper resolutely believes that proper nutrition (through a whole food, plant-based diet)…

Find out more »

TALK: Cold War Crises: Foreign Medical Graduates Enter the U.S. Workforce

October 20, 2017 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

A Postdoctoral Fellow in Penn’s Program on Race, Science, and Society, Eram Alam is completing a book, The Care of Foreigners, that explores the enduring consequences of the Cold War migration of thousands of Asian physicians to the United States. Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program

Find out more »

Atomic Blonde

October 20, 2017 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte

Magic Lantern screening of Atomic Blonde at 7 pm and 10 pm.

Find out more »

Improvability Murder Mystery Show

October 20, 2017 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3
Find out more »

Atomic Blonde

October 23, 2017 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte

Magic Lantern screening of Atomic Blonde at 7 pm and 10 pm.

Find out more »

Talk: Interstellar Crossings: The Image of Exoplanets and the Imagination of Other Worlds
Lisa Messeri

October 26, 2017 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

When seven rocky planets were discovered around the star TRAPPIST-1, claims of potentially habitable worlds animated the scientific discourse and press coverage. Beautiful animations of the surfaces of these planets and imaginative tales of planet hopping suggested that this discovery was not just about discovering more planets, but that it was also about discovering worlds. In this talk, Messeri will recount ethnographic findings from her work with exoplanet astronomers. She will explore how planets become worlds and what resources scientists draw on to execute this conceptual crossing and imaginatively leave the boundary of our world to extend human presence beyond the solar system.

Find out more »

TALK: Jackals and Arabs (Once More: The German-Jewish Dialogue)

October 26, 2017 @ 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Mosher Alumni Hall, Mosher Alumni House, UC Santa Barbara

The lecture takes its point of departure in Maurice Blanchot’s claim that Kafka initiates a new form of dialogue. By reinserting Kafka in the debates (or dialogues) on the German-Jewish dialogue and the way in which that dialogue was always already framing, rehearsing and announcing the Arab-Jewish dialogue, Anidjar argues for the significance of form — and what it entails — in and toward the Arab-Jewish dialogue. Gil Anidjar teaches in the departments of Religion and of Middle Eastern, South Asian and African Studies at Columbia University. He is the author, among other books, ofThe Jew, the Arab: A History of the Enemy (2003), Blood: A Critique of Christianity (2014), and most recently, Qu’appelle-t-on destruction? Heidegger, Derrida (2017). We gratefully acknowledge co-sponsorship by the Comparative Literature Program, the Departments of History and Religious Studies, the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center, Jewish Studies and the Center for Middle East Studies.

Find out more »

TALK: Embodying the Present Moment/ Master Class Open Practice

October 27, 2017 @ 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Join us for a public discussion of this performance workshop that brings together students, staff, faculty, community artists and activists who work towards social justice in their social and political spheres. The program brings to UCSB the potentialities of Theatrical Jazz for better knowing the people with whom one works, for realizing common goals, imagining programs and outreach, and for personal and community healing in a one-day session geared towards strengthened inter- and intra-university community collaboration.

Sharon Bridgforth is a 2016 Doris Duke Performing Artist, 2016 Creative Capital Artist, New Dramatists alumnae and recipient of funding from The Whitman Institute, MAP Fund and the National Performance Network Commissioning Fund. Her imagined “dat Black Mermaid Man Lady/Home” performance is published in Imagined Theatres: Writing for a Theoretical Stage and her play delta dandi is in solo/black/woman.

Find out more »

War for the Planet of the Apes + Rocky Horror Picture Show

October 27, 2017 @ 7:00 pm - October 28, 2017 @ 2:00 am
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte

Magic Lantern screening of War for the Planet of the Apes at 7 pm and 10 pm, with a bonus showing of Rocky Horror Picture Show at midnight.

Find out more »

Improvability Halloween Show

October 27, 2017 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3
Find out more »

War for the Planet of the Apes

October 30, 2017 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte

Magic Lantern screening of War for the Planet of the Apes at 7 pm and 10 pm.

Find out more »
November 2017

TALK: Discoveries in Japanese Literature: The Beginnings of a Translation History

November 1, 2017 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
4080 HSSB, HSSB UCSB

Michael Emmerich (Asian Languages and Cultures, UCLA) is the author of The Tale of Genji: Translation, Canonization, and World Literature (Columbia University Press, 2013), as well as more than a dozen book-length translations of works by Japanese writers including Kawabata Yasunari, Yoshimoto Banana, Takahashi Gen’ichirō, Akasaka Mari, Yamada Taichi, Matsuura Rieko, Kawakami Hiromi, Furukawa Hideo, and Inoue Yasushi. Sponsored by the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center, the East Asia Center, the Dept. of East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies, the Dept. of History, and the IHC’s Reinventing Japan RFG.

Find out more »

CONFERENCE: The Humanities in the Community: 2017 Convening of the Western Humanities Alliance

November 2, 2017 @ 10:30 am - November 3, 2017 @ 3:30 pm

What is the significance and power of community in the 21st century? How has community been conceptualized and created by different cultures throughout history? How are relationships between specific communities and the broader social milieu constructed and maintained? In today’s global society, what provides the impetus for a life of civic engagement, built upon democratic values, goals, and aspirations? Is the “network” the latest form of community, now disconnected from the preconditions of shared physical or social space? These and other questions will be explored in the 2017 convening of the Western Humanities Alliance.

Find out more »

TALK: How Did We Get Into This Mess?: Reclaiming Our Economy and Our Democracy

November 2, 2017 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Campbell Hall, Building 538, University of California, Santa Barbara, Mesa Rd,

Robert Reich (Chancellor's Professor and Carmel P. Friesen Chair in Public Policy, UC Berkeley) was Secretary of Labor in the Administration of Bill Clinton. He is the author of Saving Capitalism: For the Many, Not the Few (2016) and Aftershock: The Next Economy and America's Future (2013). Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; UCSB Arts and Lectures; and the Blum Center for Global Poverty Alleviation and Sustainable Development.

Find out more »

Dunkirk

November 3, 2017 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte

Magic Lantern screening of Dunkirk at 7 pm and 10 pm.

Find out more »

Improv: The Musical

November 3, 2017 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3
Find out more »

TALK: The Best Possible Immigrants: International Adoption and the American Family

November 6, 2017 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Prior to World War II, international adoption was virtually unknown, but in the twenty-first century, it has become a common practice, touching almost every American. How did the adoption of foreign children by U.S. families become an essential part of American culture in such a short period of time? Rachel Rains Winslow investigates this question, following the trail from Europe to South Korea and then to Vietnam. The Best Possible Immigrants shows how a combination of domestic trends, foreign policies, and international instabilities created an environment in which adoption flourished. Winslow’s talk will bring this historical conversation up to the present. Rachel Rains Winslow is Assistant Professor of History at Westmont College, Director of Westmont’s Center for Social Entrepreneurship, and Co-Director of Westmont’s Initiative for Public Dialogue. She is the author of The Best Possible Immigrants: International Adoption and the…

Find out more »

Dunkirk

November 6, 2017 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte

Magic Lantern screening of Dunkirk at 7 pm and 10 pm.

Find out more »

Research Focus Group TALK: The Chinese Typewriter: A History

November 7, 2017 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Chinese writing is character-based, the one major world script that is neither alphabetic nor syllabic. Over the past two centuries, Chinese script has encountered presumed alphabetic universalism at every turn, whether in the form of Morse Code, Braille, stenography, Linotype, punch cards, word processing, or other systems developed with the Latin alphabet in mind. Today, however, after more than a century of resistance against the alphabetic, not only have Chinese characters prevailed, they form the linguistic substrate of the vibrant world of Chinese information technology. In this talk, Stanford historian Tom Mullaney shows how this unlikely transformation happened, by charting out a fascinating series of experiments, prototypes, failures, and successes in the century-long struggle between Chinese characters and the QWERTY keyboard. Thomas S. Mullaney is Associate Professor of Chinese History at Stanford University, and Curator of the international exhibition, “Radical…

Find out more »

AWARD: Luis Leal Award for Distinction in Chicano/Latino Literature

November 7, 2017 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Corwin Pavilion, 494 UCEN Rd

Norma Cantu (Trinity University) will receive this year's Luis Leal Award.  She is best known for her-coming of age memoir Canicula. Sponsored by the Chicano/Latino Research Group.

Find out more »

Research Focus Group Talk: The Highway, Automobility, and New Promises in 1960s Bombay Cinema

November 8, 2017 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

A fascination for color in the 1960s led to Bombay cinema’s mobilization of the hinterland as the site for a new future. With the development of Indian highways and an increase in automobility, a new map of India now occupied the cinematic imagination. This talk will explore the links between the infrastructure of automobile culture, the highway, industrial development outside the city, and 1960s Bombay Cinema. Ranjani Mazumdar is Professor of Cinema Studies at the School of Arts and Aesthetics, Jawaharlal Nehru University. Her publications focus on urban cultures, popular cinema, gender, and the cinematic city. She is the author of Bombay Cinema: An Archive of the City (2007) and co-author with Nitin Govil of The Indian Film Industry (forthcoming). Her current research focuses on globalization and film culture, the visual culture of film posters, and the intersection of technology,…

Find out more »

HUMANITIES DECANTED: Elisabeth Weber, Kill Boxes: Facing the Legacy of US-Sponsored Torture, Indefinite Detention and Drone Warfare

November 9, 2017 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Join us for a discussion of Elisabeth Weber's new work. Refreshments will be served. Kill Boxes addresses the legacy of US-sponsored torture, indefinite detention and drone warfare by deciphering the shocks of recognition that humanistic and artistic responses to violence bring to consciousness if readers and viewers have eyes to face them. The book provides intensive readings of philosophical texts by Jean Améry, Jacques Derrida, and Christian Thomasius, with poetic texts by Franz Kafka, Paul Muldoon, and the poet-detainees of Guantánamo Bay Prison Camp, and with artistic creations by Sallah Edine Sallat, the American artist collective Forkscrew and an international artist collective from Pakistan, France and the US. Kill Boxes demonstrates the complexity of humanistic responses to crimes committed in the name of national security.Elisabeth Weber’s publications include Speaking about Torture (Fordham, 2012), co-edited with Julie Carlson, and the edited collection Living…

Find out more »

CONFERENCE: The XXI Colloquium on Mexican Literature, “Nepantla, Between Comala and California, and Other Crossroads”

November 9, 2017 @ 4:30 pm - November 11, 2017 @ 5:00 pm
Centennial House, UCSB, Centennial House

Department of Spanish and Portuguese, University of Santa Barbara & UC-Mexicanistas (Intercampus Research Program) Just as we were in the middle of organizing this colloquium, creatively and excitedly, we suddenly learned of the devastation in Texas, México (Oaxaca, Chiapas, Morelos), Florida, Cuba, Puerto Rico.  We remained strong through this hardship.  On September 19, ironically on the 32nd anniversary of the tragic 1985 Mexico City earthquake, another earthquake struck again.   And yet, in the midst of crisis, we also witnessed people from all over the world coming together, saving lives, giving hope: solidarity.  Our countries are slowly rising, again, our spirits can only grow stronger in times of need.  Therefore, we dedicate our colloquium to the victims and the people rebuilding their communities, healing together. Because during times like these, we must remind ourselves that only united can we endure anything. We…

Find out more »

Research Focus Group Talk: The Ritual Music Culture of Bangladesh

November 9, 2017 @ 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm
3001E HSSB, HSSB UCSB

Saymon Zakaria will reflect on the rich array of musical forms and cultural performances that have developed around religious rituals in Bangladesh. He will explore the intersecting networks of religious sentiments evoked by Bangladeshi musical performers from diverse religious communities, including Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist, and Christian performers. Dr. Saymon Zakaria is Assistant Director of the Folklore Department in the Bangla Academy in Dhaka, Bangladesh. A scholar of Bangladeshi folklore, his publications include Pronomohi Bongomata: Indigenous Cultural Forms of Bangladesh (2011), an ethnographic study of the aesthetics and sociocultural formation of popular dramatic performances in Bangladesh. Most recently, he has brought to fruition the groundbreaking work of Carol Salomon following her untimely death in 2009 by serving as editor, along with UCSB doctoral student Keith Cantú, of City of Mirrors: Songs of Lalan Sai (2017), a compilation of songs by the…

Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Screening: Logan Lucky

November 10, 2017 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte

Magic Lantern screening of Logan Lucky at 7 pm and 10 pm.

Find out more »

IV Live: Improvability Western Show

November 10, 2017 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3
Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Screening: Logan Lucky

November 13, 2017 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte

Magic Lantern screening of Logan Lucky at 7 pm and 10 pm.

Find out more »

IHC Fellow TALK: Plastic China, Plastic Chain: An Inconvenient Truth about Recycling

November 14, 2017 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Until the Chinese government's new trade policy on waste importation this year, the environmental and practical impact of the global waste trade has been largely absent from US scientific and theoretical studies on waste. These new policies, however, are predicted to have a catastrophic impact on the American scrap recycling industry and have therefore ignited a conversation. This talk uses the lens of the critically acclaimed yet domestically banned documentary Plastic China (2016) by Jiuliang Wang to investigate both industrial statistics and out-of-sight practices of plastic scrap recycling. It is only when the "foreign" part of the story is told that we can rethink "recycling," which is itself a controversial packaging concept of consumer culture. The global fluidity of waste engages and enriches theories about plasticity, plastic-organism contact, environmental justice, political economy, and documentary intervention, as well as intimately connects…

Find out more »

Research Support Workshop: Human Subjects

November 15, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
4108 Education, Education Building, UCSB

A research integrity specialist from the Office of Research will explain the Institutional Review Board process and discuss ethical issues for researches who work with human subjects.

Find out more »

Research Focus Group Talk: Buddhism and Sexuality: A Primer

November 15, 2017 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
3041 HSSB, HSSB, UCSB

Although an ascetic religion that touts celibacy as the norm (at least for the clergy), Buddhism has a lot to say about sexuality. José Cabezón’s talk will focus on ancient South Asian sources and will present an overview of what classical Buddhist authors have had to say about sex. Based on his recently published book, Sexuality in Classical South Asian Buddhism (Wisdom Publications, 2017), the talk will explore the themes of sexuality in Buddhist cosmological writings, the Buddhist theory of sexual desire, the interventions that monks and nuns have used to counteract desire, Buddhist ideas of sexual deviance, and Buddhist sexual ethics. José Cabezón is Professor of Religious Studies and the XIVth Dalai Lama Professor of Tibetan Buddhism and Cultural Studies at UCSB. His wide-ranging research interests in various aspects of Tibetan religious traditions and religious studies include Madhyamaka philosophy,…

Find out more »

FILM SCREENING: “Latino: The Changing Face of America”

November 17, 2017 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Join us for a film screening of "Latino: the Changing Face of America". A discussion and reception with the director, Roxanne Frias (UCSB EAP alumna) will follow. Sponsored by the Education Abroad Program; the Multicultural Center; the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center; and the Chicana/o Studies Department.

Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Screening: Kingsman

November 17, 2017 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte

Magic Lantern screening of Kinsgman at 7 pm and 10 pm.

Find out more »

IV Live: Improvability: UCSB vs. CalPoly

November 17, 2017 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3
Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Screening: Kingsman

November 20, 2017 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte

Magic Lantern screening of Kingsman at 7 pm and 10 pm.

Find out more »

RESEARCH FOCUS GROUP TALK: BEYOND BOKO HARAM: WRITING THE HISTORY OF BORNO
Vincent Hirribaren

November 29, 2017 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
6056 HSSB, 6056 HSSB. UC Santa Barbara

Hiribarren addresses the issue of presentism in historical writing in an African context. The region of Borno in Nigeria is well known for being the cradle of Boko Haram and many analysts have tried to understand the reasons behind the numerous terrorist attacks since 2009, the kidnapping of the Chibok girls in 2014, or the renewed jihad in West Africa. Writing the history of the northeastern corner of Nigeria remains difficult because of the security situation - of course - but also because of the pressure exerted by the current events on academic writing. Can we write the history of Borno beyond Boko Haram?' Vincent Hiribarren is a Senior Lecturer in Modern African History at King’s College London and Co-founder of Africa4, a Libération blog. He received his MA from Sorbonne University and his PhD from University of Leeds. Dr.…

Find out more »

Research Focus Group Talk: One and Indivisible? Slavery, Federalism and Secessionism in the French-Haitian Revolution
Manuel Covo (History, UCSB)

November 30, 2017 @ 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
2252 HSSB, HSSB, UCSB

“The Republic is one and indivisible”: this principle was the founding dogma of the regime that emerged during the French Revolution. The Republic, however, still “owned” colonies and the plantation societies in the French West Indies could not be more at odds with the principle of universal equality. Was the regeneration effected by the Revolution compatible with the maintenance of a colonial empire? This paper will explore the heated colonial debates on French federalism, secessionism, and slavery in the age of Atlantic revolutions. Professor Covo is a historian of the transition from early modern to modern European colonialism in the long eighteenth century. He specializes in French imperialism, political economy and Atlantic revolutions, with a special focus on the impact of the Haitian Revolution on France and the United States. Sponsored by IHC’s Slavery, Captivity, and the Meaning of Freedom…

Find out more »
December 2017

Magic Lantern Films Screening: IT

December 1, 2017 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte

Magic Lantern screening of IT at 7 pm and 10 pm.

Find out more »

IV Live: Improv Goes Camping

December 1, 2017 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3
Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Screening: IT

December 4, 2017 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte

Magic Lantern screening of IT at 7 pm and 10 pm.

Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Screening: Elf and The Nightmare Before Christmas

December 8, 2017 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte

Magic Lantern screening of holiday films. See Elf at 7:00PM, complete with hot chocolate and an Ugly Sweater Contest! At 9:00PM, there will be a screening of Don Hertzfedlt's short, World of Tomorrow. And at 10:00PM, enjoy candy while watching The Nightmare Before Christmas.

Find out more »

IV Live: Improvability Naughty & Nice Show

December 8, 2017 @ 8:00 pm - December 9, 2017 @ 12:00 am
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

8:00 pm Nice Show 10:00 Naughty Show

Find out more »
January 2018

Crossings+Boundaries TALK: Opening the Gates of Heaven: Religious and Philosophical Implications of Space Exploration
Michael Waltemathe

January 11, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Religion and philosophy have always been present in human space exploration, in the form of religious rituals practiced during space missions, placement of sacred objects in space, and astronauts’ descriptions of transcendental changes in perspective when looking back on Earth. Space exploration also poses ethical, religious, and philosophical challenges. How, for example, do we protect other celestial bodies from contamination by human space exploration? How do we protect the Earth from contamination by extraterrestrial samples brought back on spaceships? How will human society be represented to extraterrestrial beings? What are the wide-ranging implications of finding life in the universe? In his talk, Waltemathe will discuss these issues, exploring questions that seem to belong to the realm of science fiction while focusing on scientifically plausible exploration scenarios. Michael Waltemathe is senior lecturer in the Department of Protestant Theology at Ruhr-University Bochum…

Find out more »

IV Live Presents Improvability: Winter Wonderland

January 19, 2018 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

Improvability Winter Wonderland show.

Find out more »

Research Development Workshop: Proposal Writing 101

January 24, 2018 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
6056 HSSB, 6056 HSSB. UC Santa Barbara

Learn about the different types of extramural funding and university protocol for proposal submission. Workshop will also cover the anatomy of a proposal and include writing tips

Find out more »

Research Focus Group Talk: Cold War Curvature: Measuring and Modeling Gravity in Postwar American Physics
David Kaiser

January 24, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

A popular image persists of Albert Einstein as a loner, someone who avoided the hustle and bustle of everyday life in favor of quiet contemplation. Yet Einstein was deeply engaged with politics throughout his life; indeed, he was so active politically that the FBI kept him under surveillance for decades. His most enduring scientific legacy, the general theory of relativity – physicists' reigning explanation of gravity and the basis for nearly all our thinking about the cosmos – has likewise been cast as an austere temple standing aloof from the all-too-human dramas of political history. But was it so? By focusing on examples of research on general relativity from the 1950s and 1960s, this lecture will examine some of the ways in which research on Einstein's theory was embedded in, and at times engulfed by, the tumult of world politics.…

Find out more »

HUMANITIES DECANTED: Robert Samuels, Educating Inequality: Beyond the Political Myths of Higher Education and the Job Market

January 25, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Join us for a dialogue between Robert Samuels (Writing) and Heather Steffen (English and Writing) about Samuels’ new work, Educating Inequality. Refreshments will be served. Politicians and school officials often argue that higher education is the solution to many of our social and economic problems. Educating Inequality argues that in order to reduce inequality and enhance social mobility, public policies are needed to revamp the financial aid system and increase the number of good jobs. Exploring topics such as the fairness of the current social system, the focus on individual competition in an unequal society, and democracy and capitalism in higher education, this important book seeks to uncover the major myths that shape how people view higher education and its relation to the economy. Looking to models that generate economic mobility and social equality, this book advocates a broader vision…

Find out more »

Talk: Financialization on the Factory Farm
Jan Dutkiewicz

January 26, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Jan Dutkiewicz (Politics, New School for Social Research), who is writing a dissertation at the New School on the political economy of hog farming in the contemporary United States, is currently a fellow at UCSB’s International Center for the Humanities and Social Change. This event is part of "Food, Finance, and American Politics," a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Presents: Loving Vincent, World of Tomorrow, and The Rocky Horror Picture Show

January 26, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - January 27, 2018 @ 2:00 am
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Triple Feature! Loving Vincent at 7:00 PM World of Tomorrow at 7:00 PM The Rocky Horror Picture Show at midnight.

Find out more »

IV Live Presents Star Wars: Improv Strikes Back

January 26, 2018 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

Improvability Star Wars show.

Find out more »

Taubman Symposium Talk: The Betrayers
David Bezmozgis

January 28, 2018 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Corwin Pavilion, 494 UCEN Rd
Free

David Bezmozgis is an award-winning writer and filmmaker. He is the author of several books, including Natasha and Other Stories (2004), The Free World (2011), and The Betrayers (2014). His writing has been published in The New Yorker, Harpers, Zoetrope All-Story, and The Walrus, among other publications. Bezmozgis is currently the head of the Humber School for Writers in Toronto. Sponsored by the  Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Foundation Endowed Symposia in Jewish Studies.

Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Present: Loving Vincent and World of Tomorrow

January 29, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Double Feature! Loving Vincent at 7:00 PM World of Tomorrow at 10:00 PM

Find out more »

Research Development Workshop: Undergraduate Research

January 30, 2018 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
4108 Education, Education Building, UCSB

How to engage undergraduate students in social science, humanities, education research. Prof. Anne Charity-Hudley.

Find out more »
February 2018

Crossings+Boundaries TALK: Dreamland: America’s Opiate Epidemic and How We Got Here
Sam Quinones

February 1, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Click here to read an article about Quinones' talk. Quinones will discuss the origins of our nationwide opioid epidemic: pharmaceutical marketing, changes in our heroin market, and new attitudes toward pain among American healthcare consumers. He will also discuss cultural shifts that made this epidemic possible. Sam Quinones is a Los Angeles-based freelance journalist and author of three books of narrative nonfiction. His book Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic won a National Book Critics Circle award for the Best Nonfiction Book of 2015. He has reported on immigration, gangs, drug trafficking, and the border as a reporter for the L.A. Times (2004–2014) and as a freelance writer in Mexico (1994–2004). Sponsored by the IHC's Crossings + Boundaries series, the Walter H. Capps Center for the Study of Ethics, Religion, and Public Life, and the IHC's Idee Levitan Endowment.

Find out more »

Talk: Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America
Nancy MacLean

February 2, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

In addition to Democracy in Chains (2016), Nancy MacLean (History, Duke) is the author of the award-winning books Freedom is Not Enough: the Opening of the American Workplace (2008) and Behind the Mask of Chivalry: the Making of the Second Ku Klux Klan (1995). She is a past president of the Labor and Working-Class History Association. This event is part of “Food, Finance, and American Politics,” a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Presents: The Florida Project

February 2, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of The Florida Project at 7:00 and 10:00 PM.

Find out more »

IV Live Presents Improvability: Flashback Friday

February 2, 2018 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

Improvability Flashback Friday show.

Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Presents: The Florida Project

February 5, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of The Florida Project at 7:00 and 10:00 PM.

Find out more »

Research Focus Group Conference: Queer Hemisphere: América Cuir

February 8, 2018 @ 9:00 am - February 9, 2018 @ 4:00 pm

Queer Hemisphere: América Cuir is a two-day conference comprised of six interdisciplinary graduate student panels, two keynote presentations, one by Prof. Sayak Valencia (author of Capitalismo Gore) and the other by performance artist Lorena Wolffer (Mapping Dissent), a keywords dialogue with Prof. Marcia Ochoa (UCSC), and a charla with UCSB Profs. Micaela Díaz-Sánchez and Cherríe Moraga. On the conference theme: This conference will bring together scholars from Mexico, Brazil, Peru, other Andean countries, as well as Latinx communities in the US, along with activists and performers, to analyze the challenges of studying gender and sexuality in the Americas, under the current threat of racist populism, state violence, and new forms of mobilization. Queer Hemisphere: América Cuir grows out of a UCHRI-sponsored working group by the same name. All are welcome. Sponsored by the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center; the Latin American & Iberian Studies Program;…

Find out more »

Crossings + Boundaries Talks: Sayak Valencia and Lorena Wolffer

February 8, 2018 @ 3:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Talk: From Queer to Cuir: Geopolitical Ostranenie from the Global South Sayak Valencia’s talk will explore the politics of survival and the alliances of the trans/border/messtizx/sissy/lesbian/dressed/slut-fag/cripple. The word “cuir” represents a defamiliarization—or ostranenie—of “queer,” which challenges automatic reading and registers, through its unfamiliarity, a geopolitical inflection southward and from the peripheries. Countering colonial epistemology and Anglo-American historiography, cuir invokes a space of decolonialized enunciation, at once playful and critical. Sayak Valencia (Cultural Studies, El Colegio de la Frontera Norte) is the author of Capitalismo Gore. Talk: Citizen Affects/Afectxs ciudadanxs Lorena Wolffer will discuss her experiences producing Citizen Affects/Afectxs ciudadanxs at UC Santa Barbara and at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) in Mexico City in 2017. This participatory cultural interventions project is focused on the affects that cross, regulate, and define women, queer, and non-normative individuals in our interaction with others…

Find out more »

Conference: Patterns and Networks in Classical Chinese Literature: Notes from the Digital Frontier

February 9, 2018 @ 9:00 am - February 10, 2018 @ 1:00 pm

Twelve scholars from around the globe will present examples of the groundbreaking research taking place at the intersection of digital humanities and classical Chinese literary studies. Covering poetry, prose, fiction, history, linguistics, and philosophy over the course of two millennia, these studies will show how computing technologies can help researchers uncover previously unseen patterns and networks in their materials, shedding new light on premodern texts. Keynote Address by Michael Fuller (East Asian Languages and Literatures, UC Irvine), "Digital Humanities and the Discontents of Meaning," on Friday, February 9 at 4:30 PM. Free and open to the public. Conference participants include: JING CHEN (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), TIMOTHY CLIFFORD (Bryn Mawr College), MICHAEL FULLER (UC Irvine), YI-LONG HUANG (National Tsing Hua University), CHAO-LIN LIU (National Chengchi University), CHEN LIU (Kyoto University), THOMAS MAZANEC (UCSB), EVAN NICOLL-JOHNSON (University of Alberta), DONALD STURGEON (Harvard…

Find out more »

Research Focus Group Talk: Recognizing (and not recognizing) the richness of children’s linguistic repertoires: A raciolinguistic perspective on identity and interaction in urban schools
Ramón Antonio Martínez

February 9, 2018 @ 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
1205 Education, Gevirtz Graduate School of Education, UCSB

This talk draws on “raciolinguistic ” perspectives to explore how language and race were perceived, constructed, and invoked in a diverse urban elementary school in Los Angeles, California. Based on ethnographic and interactional data from a Spanish-English dual language classroom, the talk illustrates how “raciolinguistic ideologies” mediated the construction of racialized subjectivities and reified forms of language among a diverse group of multilingual children and their teachers. The dynamic translingual practices of these children are contrasted with the static notions of both language and race that predominate in the discourse around educational diversity. Foregrounding the relationship between language and racialization highlights the processes by which these children’s forms of semiosis were variously displayed, ignored, (mis)construed, and recruited in the construction of racialized identities. The talk concludes by addressing the role of an analytic focus on children’s linguistic practices and ideologies…

Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Presents: Thor: Ragnarok

February 9, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Thor: Ragnarok at 7:00 and 10:00 PM.

Find out more »

IV Live Presents Improvability: The Musical Show

February 9, 2018 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

Improvability Musical Show

Find out more »

Presentation: Imagining America
Erica Kohl-Arenas

February 12, 2018 @ 10:00 am - 11:30 am

Please join us for a presentation by Imagining America director Erica Kohl-Arenas about public humanities and arts. The event will take place at 10:00 AM in the McCune Conference Room and will include audience discussion. Imagining America (IA) is currently based at UC Davis, its third host campus, as of July 2017. Comprised of a network of college and university members and community partners, IA’s annual programming includes convening a national conference and cultural organizing institutes, and collaborative research and action projects. IA contributes resources to an expanding membership; offers opportunities for undergraduate and graduate student leaders, including the Publicly Active Graduate Education (PAGE) network, an annual cohort funded by IA that acts as a incubator for scholarly writing, innovative thinking, and bold experimentation; and provides significant leadership to the field of engaged scholarship in higher education, as evidenced in Public: A Journal of Imagining America,…

Find out more »

Talk: Jews and Revolution: The American Experience
Tony Michels

February 12, 2018 @ 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Corwin Pavilion, 494 UCEN Rd
Free

Tony Michels is the George L. Mosse Professor of American Jewish History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is the author of Jewish Radicals: A Documentary History (2012) and A Fire in Their Hearts: Yiddish Socialists in New York (2005). Michels is the co-editor of The Cambridge History of Judaism: Volume 8. The Modern World, 1815-2000 (2017). Sponsored by the Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Foundation Endowed Symposia in Jewish Studies at UC Santa Barbara.

Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Presents: Thor: Ragnarok

February 12, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Thor: Ragnarok at 7:00 and 10:00 PM.

Find out more »

Research Development Workshop: Academic Strategic Planning

February 15, 2018 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
1150 Kerr, Kerr Hall, UCSB

Aligning your time with your priorities (NCFDD webinar)!

Find out more »

Talk: Plantation Labor Outsourced: Rethinking New England Outwork and the National Economy of Slavery in Antebellum America
Seth Rockman

February 16, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Seth Rockman (History, Brown) is the author of Scraping By: Wage Labor, Slavery, and Survival in Early Baltimore (2008) and co-editor, with Sven Beckert, of Slavery’s Capitalism: A New History of American Economic Development (2016). This event is part of “Food, Finance, and American Politics,” a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Presents: Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri

February 16, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri at 7:00 and 10:00 PM.

Find out more »

IV Live Presents Improvability: Anti-Valentine’s Day

February 16, 2018 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

Improvability Anti-Valentine's Day Show

Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Presents: Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri

February 19, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri at 7:00 and 10:00 PM.

Find out more »

Film Screening: Beyond Fordlandia

February 21, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm

Written and directed by Marcos Colón, Beyond Fordlândia (2017, 75 min) presents an environmental account of Henry Ford’s Amazon experience decades after its failure. The story addressed by the film begins in 1927, when the Ford Motor Company attempted to establish rubber plantations on the Tapajós River, a primary tributary of the Amazon. This film addresses the recent transition from failed rubber to successful soybean cultivation for export, and its implication for land usage. There will be a Q&A with director Marcos Colón after the film. Sponsored by the Department of Spanish & Portuguese; Latin American and Iberian Studies; the Department of Anthropology; and the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center.

Find out more »

HUMANITIES DECANTED: Bhaskar Sarkar, “No Man’s (Is)land: Ecology of a Border”

February 22, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Join us for a dialogue between Bhaskar Sarkar (Film and Media Studies) and Lisa Sun-Hee Park (Asian American Studies) about Sarkar’s new article, “No Man’s (Is)land: Ecology of a Border.” Refreshments will be served. Focusing on a stretch of the international border between Bangladesh and India that coincides with the river Ganges, Sarkar’s new article examines the ambiguous productivities of proliferating borders in the era of globalization. In this overpopulated region of South Asia, the Farakka barrage has compounded problems of riverbank erosion, causing the loss of arable lands and homes. When displaced communities move to the silt islands—chars— that emerge in the middle of the river, they pose a problem for both states: are they citizens or foreigners? Analyzing a documentary film about the char people, Sarkar explores contemporary documentary’s engagement with border ecologies and migrant communities, state policies…

Find out more »

Research Development Workshop: Research Plus Interdisciplinarity

February 23, 2018 @ 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm

Faculty engaged or interested in interdisciplinary research projects are invited to join the next UC Humanities Research Plus webinar on February 23 from 1:30-2:30 pm. UC Santa Barbara Associate Director of Research Development Brandon Fastman will talk about interdisciplinary collaboration with Ann Taves, Professor of Religious Studies at UCSB. To bridge the humanities and the sciences, Taves has established the Religion, Experience, and Mind (REM) Lab Group. Its goals are to assist in the development of individual and collaborative research projects, including papers, dissertations, and grant proposals, that seek to understand the interaction of religion, experience, and mind across traditions and cultures. Fastman and Taves will discuss how humanities centers and research development staff can create an environment for fostering productive collaborations with researchers from across the disciplines and how to nurture such collaborations into successful proposals. Faculty interested in joining the webinar should…

Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Presents: I, Tonya

February 23, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of I, Tonya at 7:00 and 10:00 PM.

Find out more »

IV Live Presents Improvability: Random Show

February 23, 2018 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

Improvability Random Show

Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Presents: I, Tonya

February 26, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of I, Tonya at 7:00 and 10:00 PM.

Find out more »

Research Focus Group Talk: Finding Echigo in Edo: Snow Country Migrants and their Urban Worlds
Amy Stanley

February 28, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
4080 HSSB, HSSB UCSB

The Echigo province migrant was a familiar type in nineteenth-century Edo. Every year in the tenth month, snow country peasants would come down the mountains on the Nakasendō Highway and enter the city through Itabashi Station. They wandered down the main street in Hongō, where they were met by labor scouts who had learned to recognize their bewildered expressions and country accents. Many ended up in the city’s notorious boarding houses for laborers, where they were dispatched to rice polishers and bathhouses. Others found work in service with the help of migrants who had come before. Most went home eventually, but others stayed on in the city to become shop owners, peddlers, and even low-ranking samurai. This talk delineates the importance of regional connections and rural-urban migration in the development of Japan’s largest city, and considers how documents kept in…

Find out more »

Crossings + Boundaries Talk: Exodus: The Largest Movement of People Since the Second World War
Dexter Filkins

February 28, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Corwin Pavilion, 494 UCEN Rd

The world is witnessing the greatest mass migration since 1945. More than sixty-five million people, about one in every hundred on Earth, have fled their homes. Some are internally displaced; others are refugees who have moved to multiple countries. This talk will discuss the three main causes of this giant human tide: the implosion of the Middle East following the Arab Spring; climate change, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, where drought and advancing deserts are pushing people to abandon their homes; and famine, because of which at least twenty million people are currently at risk of starvation, most of them in Nigeria, South Sudan, Yemen, and Somalia. In his talk, Filkins will take the audience on a tour of these places and discuss ways to address the complex causes of mass migration. Filkins has been a staff writer with The New Yorker since…

Find out more »
March 2018

Talk: Burgers in the Age of Black Capitalism: Fast Food and the Remaking of Civil Rights after 1968
Marcia Chatelain

March 2, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Marcia Chatelain (History, Georgetown) is the author of South Side Girls: Growing up in the Great Migration (2015) and co-editor, with Britta Waldschmidt-Nelson, of Staging a Dream: Untold Stories and Transatlantic Legacies of the March on Washington (2015). This event is part of “Food, Finance, and American Politics,” a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

Find out more »

Conference: Beyond Academia

March 2, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - March 3, 2018 @ 4:00 pm
Corwin Pavilion, 494 UCEN Rd

The Beyond Academia conference at UC Santa Barbara is an annual event aimed at preparing graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in all stages and disciplines to pursue a wide range of career options after graduate school. The conference offers attendees the opportunity to interact with professionals who have established careers outside the professoriate in industry, government, administration, nonprofits, and more. Come learn about potential careers in a variety of sectors and specialties outside of and alongside academia. Whether you are on the job market or just starting to explore career options, the Beyond Academia conference will help you create an action plan for your future. Sponsored by the UCSB Graduate Division; Stimulating Entrepreneurial and Economic Development in Santa Barbara (SEED-SB); UCSB Career Services; UCSB Center for Science & Engineering Partnerships; Materials Department; Computer Science Department; Physics Department; Electrical & Computer…

Find out more »

Research Focus Group Symposium: Cross-Currents: Navigating Translation
Cutcha Risling Baldy and Donald L. Fixico

March 2, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - March 4, 2018 @ 5:00 pm

Please join the American Indian & Indigenous Collective (AIIC) and keynote speakers Dr. Cutcha Risling-Baldy and Dr. Donald Fixico for three days of panels, presentations and discussions exploring the cross-current of translation writ large for Native and Indigenous peoples. Dr. Cutcha Risling Baldy, Assistant Professor of Native American Studies at Humboldt State University. Her research is focused on Indigenous feminisms, California Indians and decolonization. She has published in the Ecological Processes journal, the Wicazo Sa Review, and the Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education and Society journal. She has also published creative writing in the As/Us journal and News from Native California. Dr. Donald L. Fixico, Professor of History at Arizona State University. He is a policy historian and ethno-historian, focusing on American Indians, oral history and the U.S. West. His publications include: American Indians in a Modern World (2008); Treaties with American…

Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Presents: Clueless and Mean Girls

March 2, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Clueless at 7:00 and Mean Girls at 10:00 PM.

Find out more »

IV Live Presents Improvability: 90th Annual Academy Awards

March 2, 2018 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

Improvability 90th Annual Academy Awards show

Find out more »

Research Development Workshop: Intro to the NEH

March 5, 2018 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
6056 HSSB, 6056 HSSB. UC Santa Barbara

Learn about grant programs at the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Presents: Fast Times at Ridgemont High and The Breakfast Club

March 5, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Fast Times at Ridgemont High at 7:00 and of The Breakfast Club at 10:00 PM.

Find out more »

Crossings + Boundaries Talk: Murder and Mattering in Harambe’s House
Claire Jean Kim

March 6, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Date change to Tuesday, March 6th at 4:00PM. This talk approaches the controversy over the killing of the gorilla Harambe in the Cincinnati Zoo in May 2016 as a unique window onto the making of animalness and blackness in the contemporary U.S.  It will explore the notion of a racial-zoological order in which the “human” is constructed simultaneously in relation to both the “black” and the “animal.” Claire Jean Kim is Professor of Political Science and Asian American Studies at University of California, Irvine.  She is the author of Bitter Fruit: The Politics of Black-Korean Conflict in New York City (2000) and Dangerous Crossings: Race, Species, and Nature in a Multicultural Age (2015), both of which won book awards from the American Political Science Association. Sponsored by the IHC’s Crossings + Boundaries series and the Sara Miller McCune and George…

Find out more »

The 2018 Diana and Simon Raab Writer-in-Residence: Helen Macdonald

March 7, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Corwin Pavilion, 494 UCEN Rd

This year’s Diana and Simon Raab Writer-in-Residence is acclaimed naturalist and writer Helen Macdonald. She is the author of three books, including Shaler’s Fish (2001), Falcon (2006), and H Is for Hawk (2014), winner of the Samuel Johnson Prize for non-fiction, the Costa Book Award, and the Prix du Meilleur Livre Étranger. Her work includes poetry, naturalist non-fiction about birds, and memoir. She is a contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine. In addition to her work as a writer, Macdonald has contributed to various film and television programs, most notably the 2017 documentary “H Is for Hawk: The Next Chapter” for PBS Nature, the film “10 X Murmuration,” made in collaboration with filmmaker Sarah Wood for the 2015 Brighton Festival, and the BBC Four documentary series, “Birds Britannia.” She is also an Affiliated Research Scholar in the Department…

Find out more »

Taubman Symposia Talk: Biblical Women and Gender Constructions: Ancient and Contemporary Perspectives on Women in the Bible
Tamara Cohn Eskenazi

March 8, 2018 @ 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm
Santa Barbara Hillel, 781 Embarcadero del Mar
Free

Rabbi Prof. Dr. Tamara Cohn Eskenazi is the Effie Wise Ochs Professor of Biblical Literature and History at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in Los Angeles. She is the first woman appointed as a professor to the rabbinical faculty since the founding of Hebrew Union College in 1875. At Hebrew Union College, Dr. Eskenazi trains rabbis, educators, and Jewish communal service professionals, as well as graduate students in Judaic Studies. Dr. Eskenazi is an award-winning editor, author, and biblical scholar. She is the Chief Editor of The Torah: A Women's Commentary, the winner (with Dr. Andrea Weiss) of the 2008 Jewish Book of the Year Award. This unique 1400-page book includes contributions from hundreds of women scholars, clergy, and poets. Its purpose is to bring the voices and visions of women to the interpretation of the Bible in the…

Find out more »

Conference: Bodies and Boundaries, 1500-1800

March 9, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - March 10, 2018 @ 5:30 pm
Mosher Alumni Hall, Mosher Alumni House, UC Santa Barbara

Bodies and Boundaries, 1500-1800 The Early Modern Center's Annual Conference: March 9-10, 2018 Featuring Keynotes from: Laurie Shannon (Northwestern University), "Human Boundedness: Shakespeare's Bear, Launce's Crab, and King Lear (with Sheep)" and Michelle Burnham (Santa Clara University), "Bodies at Risk: The Global Pacific in the Eighteenth Century" March 9, Mosher Alumni Hall, 1pm-5pm and March 10, McCune Conference Room, 9:30am-5:30pm

Find out more »

Research Focus Group Talk: LISO’s Annual John J. Gumperz Lecture
John B. Haviland

March 9, 2018 @ 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
1205 Education, Gevirtz Graduate School of Education, UCSB

John B. Haviland will present a lecture on “K’alal Lajyak’bekon Notisia, ‘Bweno Ta Xinupunkutik’, Gloria a Dios, Háganlo Bien (When they told me ‘Well, we’re getting married’—Glory to God! Do it well!): Changing Tzotzil Discourses of Marriage.” Haviland is an anthropological linguist, with interests in the social life of language, including gesture, emerging sign languages, and interaction. His work concentrates on Tzotzil (Mayan) speaking peasant corn farmers from Zinacantán, Chiapas, Mexico, and on speakers of Guugu Yimithirr (Paman), especially at the Hopevale Aboriginal Community, near Cooktown, in northern Queensland, Australia. He has most recently engaged in two fieldwork projects: one an ongoing study of language origins based on extensive documentation of a first generation sign language (Zinacantec Family Homesign, or ZFHS) from Chiapas, Mexico; and the other with speakers of Amuzgo (Otomanguean), both in their home community in Oaxaca and…

Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Presents: The Shape of Water

March 9, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of The Shape of Water at 7:00 and 10:00 PM.

Find out more »

IV Live Presents Improvability: Friday Night Live!

March 9, 2018 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

Improvability Friday Night Live Show

Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Presents: The Shape of Water

March 12, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of The Shape of Water at 7:00 and 10:00 PM.

Find out more »

Research Development Workshop: Grant Budgets

March 14, 2018 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
2218 North Hall, North Hall, UCSB

How to Write a Grant Budget: how to manage grant funds.

Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Presents: Lady Bird

March 16, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Lady Bird at 7:00 and 10:00 PM.

Find out more »

IV Live Presents Improvability: Naughty & Nice

March 16, 2018 @ 8:00 pm - March 17, 2018 @ 12:00 am
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

Nice Show at 8 pm. Naughty Show at 10 pm.

Find out more »

Research Focus Group Workshop: The First Proslavery Novel? An Attribution and Analysis of the 1763 novel The Pregrinations of Jeremiah Grant, Esq. A West Indian, by Anonymous
Alpen Razi

March 19, 2018 @ 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
4065 HSSB, HSSB, UC Santa Barbara

Brown-bag lunch workshop featuring work in progress by Alpen Razi, Assistant Professor of Ethnic Studies at CalPoly. Sponsored by IHC’s Slavery, Captivity, and the Meaning of Freedom RFG.

Find out more »

Pacific Coast Conference on British Studies

March 23, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm

The Pacific Coast Conference on British Studies features papers representing all fields of British Studies -- broadly defined to include those who study the United Kingdom, its component parts and nationalities, as well as Britain's imperial cultures.. Plenary Speakers are Dr. Susan Amussen, professor of history at UC Merced, is a leading scholar of early modern Britain (1500-1750), gender, race and slavery in the Atlantic World and Dr. Jordanna Bailkin, the Jere L. Bacharach Endowed Professor in International Studies, in the history department of the University of Washington. Dr. Bailkin is a scholar of Modern Britain and its empire, who has worked broadly on topics such as Victorian liberalism, decolonization, race and decolonization. This event is Cosponsored by: UCSB College of Letters and Science Humanities and Fine Arts UCSB Interdisciplinary Humanities Center UCSB Department of History UCSB Department of English…

Find out more »
April 2018

First Writers and Scholars in Indigenous Languages and Literatures Conference: Verbal Kaleidoscope

April 4, 2018 @ 9:00 am - April 5, 2018 @ 7:00 pm

In a time where indigenous literatures are becoming more distinguishable, it is crucial to explore, challenge, and reformulate preexisting notions of spaces, identity, and knowledge. For the first time at UCSB, renowned indigenous poets of Mexico and the Basque country will establish an international dialogue with top scholars from all over the world to discuss the topic of the poetic act as a factor of visibility for marginalized cultures and political action. For the First Writers and Scholars in Indigenous Languages and Literatures Conference, we welcome Mazatec poet and director of the National Institute of Indigenous Languages (INALI), Juan Gregorio Regino, Zapotec poet and essayist, Irma Pineda Santiago and renowned scholar Patrick Johansson from the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) as representatives of indigenous literatures of Mexico. From the Basque country, our guest culture, we welcome scholar María José…

Find out more »

The Sixth Biennial Borderlands International Graduate Student Conference: Beyond Marginality: Race, Ethnicity, and Memory

April 6, 2018 @ 3:30 pm - April 8, 2018 @ 12:00 pm

Borderlands, broadly defined, are spaces where people of different ethnicities, cultures, religions, political systems, or linguistic traditions come into contact, often without any one authority exercising complete control. These encounters require both individuals and societies to adapt culturally, politically, economically, religiously, artistically, and technologically to other ways of life, often with unexpected and surprising results. The sixth biennial Borderlands International Graduate Student Conference, “Beyond Marginality: Race, Ethnicity, and Memory” showcases how studying the borderlands reveals marginality as a decentralizing process, treating the marginalized subject as the center of the discourse rather than at its outskirts. Co-sponsored by the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center; the UCSB Graduate Student Association; the Virgil Cordano, OFM, Endowment in Catholic Studies in the Department of Religious Studies at UCSB; the Departments of Anthropology, Classics, Comparative Literature, History, Global Studies, History of Art and Architecture, Religious Studies, and…

Find out more »

IV Live presents Improvability: Survivor

April 6, 2018 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

Improvability Survivor show.

Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Presents: Star Wars: The Last Jedi

April 9, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Screenings of Star Wars: The Last Jedi at 7 and 10 PM.

Find out more »

IHC Visiting Scholar Talk: Media Before Gutenberg
Ingrid Nelson

April 10, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Although “media” conjures modern, technologized modes of communication (television, the internet, print journalism), mediation is a central part of all communication. In the Middle Ages, media referred to networks of voices, texts, bodies, human actions, and nonhuman forces that were involved in sense perception, social interaction, storytelling, and other acts of cultural transmission. This talk will elaborate on the media ecology of the medieval West by putting Aristotle’s theories of sense perception in dialogue with theories of new media and embodied informatics, from Marshall McLuhan’s description of media as the “extensions of man” to N. Katherine Hayles’s cyborg theory. Understanding media before machine technologies and the era of mass communication heralded by the printing press also yields new insights into medieval literature, and this talk will conclude with a discussion of media and mediation in Geoffrey Chaucer’s masterwork, The Canterbury…

Find out more »

Crossings + Boundaries Reading: Of Great Importance
Nachoem M. Wijnberg

April 12, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Wijnberg Poetry Reading

The poems in Of Great Importance discuss taxes and debts, stocks and flows, citizenship and labor contracts, notaries and accountants, factories and strikes, freedoms and fundamental rights, how to make money and how to win elections, when to declare war and when to found a new state. The collection has been called “a painfully consistent and uncomfortably accurate analysis of power, economic and social structures and mechanisms which are at the root of the degenerate world in which we wake up each morning.” The poems look at history in order to learn something from it and build upon the best work of thinkers and poets such as Marx, Keynes, Heine, Miłosz, and especially Kaváfis. Nachoem M. Wijnberg is a Dutch poet and novelist who has been acclaimed as one of the foremost Dutch authors of the last decennia. His poetry has received many Dutch and Belgian awards,…

Find out more »

Screening: Special Yom HaShoah Event: Central Coast Premiere of Amichai Greenberg’s film The Testament

April 12, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Congregation B’nai B’rith, 1000 San Antonio Creek Rd.

To commemorate Yom HaShoah, the Taubman Symposia in Jewish Studies will present the Central Coast premiere of Amichai Greenberg's award-winning film, The Testament. The screening will take place at 7:00 pm and will be followed by a panel discussion featuring Harold Marcuse (UC Santa Barbara Department of History) and Mashey Bernstein (Emeritus Faculty Member, UC Santa Barbara Writing Program). The event is free and open to the public.

Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Presents: Paddington 2

April 13, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Paddington 2 at 7:00 and 10:00 PM.

Find out more »

IV Live presents Improvability: Mystics & Seers & Palm Readers, Oh My!

April 13, 2018 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

Improvability Mystics & Seers & Palm Readers, Oh My! show.

Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Presents: Paddington 2

April 16, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Paddington 2 at 7:00 and 10:00 PM.

Find out more »

Conference: Lukács and the World: Rethinking Global Circuits of Cultural Production

April 20, 2018 @ 10:00 am - April 21, 2018 @ 5:00 pm
Annenberg Conference Room, 4429 SSMS, Social Sciences and Media Studies, UCSB

See attached flyer for detailed schedule. Sponsored by the College of Letters and Sciences, the Center for Modern Literature, Materialism, and Aesthetics (COMMA), the Carsey-Wolf Center, IHC, Mellichamp Global Dynamics, Department of English, Department of Film and Media Studies, Department of Comparative Literature, Department of Germanic and Slavic Studies, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies.

Find out more »

Talk: Economic Justice is a Women’s Issue: The Chicana Welfare Rights Organization’s Challenge to Welfare Reform in the 1970s
Rosie Bermudez

April 20, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Bermudez is completing a dissertation, “Doing Dignity Work: Alicia Escalante and the East Los Angeles Welfare Rights Organization, 1967-1974.” She is a Woodrow Wilson Women’s Studies Fellow at UCSB. This event is a part of Economic Justice in a World of Corporate Hegemony, a series of UCSB talks and workshops sponsored by the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy; and the Policy History Program.

Find out more »

Conference: Exploring Catalan Identity

April 20, 2018 @ 2:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Mosher Alumni Hall, Mosher Alumni House, UC Santa Barbara

14:00 — Opening Remarks: Dean John Majewski and Chair Leo Cabranes-Grant 14:15-14:45— Debra Blumenthal (UCSB), “«Send me all the receipts that you have regularly»: Slave Women as Business Agents in the Late Medieval Mediterranean World” 14:50 -16:00 — Antonio Cortijo Ocaña (UCSB): “Amor y religión en la Corona de Aragón: la creación de la sentimentalidad moderna”— Óscar Perea (Lancaster University): ” La Valencia multilingüe del Cancionero general de Hernando del Castillo (1511-1514)” — Jordi Aladro Font (UC Santa Cruz): “Trento y su impacto en la iconografía de los santos más populares en la Corona de Aragón” 16:00-16:15 — Coffee break 16:15-17:30 — Josep Vicent Garcia Sebastià (Universitat d’Alacant): “«Temps ha»: saturació, intensificació i usos discursius (s. XVI-XVIII)” — Enric Mallorquí Ruscalleda (California State University, Fullerton): “Carner, Frankl, Barthes”— Eloi Grasset (UCSB): “ Modelos literarios y hegemonía cultural en la literatura catalana”…

Find out more »

IV Live presents Improvability: Summer of Love

April 20, 2018 @ 8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
Embarcadero Hall, 935 Embarcadero del Norte
$3

Improvability Summer of Love show.

Find out more »

Magic Lantern Films Presents: Winchester and Rocky Horror Picture Show

April 20, 2018 @ 10:00 pm - April 21, 2018 @ 2:00 am
IV Theater, 960 Embarcadero del Norte
$4

Showings of Winchester at 10:00 PM, and Rocky Horror Picture Show at midnight.

Find out more »
+ Export Events