Events

Loading Events
Find Events

Event Views Navigation

Upcoming Events › Harry Girvetz Memorial Endowment

Events List Navigation

January 2018

HUMANITIES DECANTED: Robert Samuels, Educating Inequality: Beyond the Political Myths of Higher Education and the Job Market

January 25, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Join us for a dialogue between Robert Samuels (Writing) and Heather Steffen (English and Writing) about Samuels’ new work, Educating Inequality. Refreshments will be served. Politicians and school officials often argue that higher education is the solution to many of our social and economic problems. Educating Inequality argues that in order to reduce inequality and enhance social mobility, public policies are needed to revamp the financial aid system and increase the number of good jobs. Exploring topics such as the fairness of the current social system, the focus on individual competition in an unequal society, and democracy and capitalism in higher education, this important book seeks to uncover the major myths that shape how people view higher education and its relation to the economy. Looking to models that generate economic mobility and social equality, this book advocates a broader vision…

Find out more »
February 2018

HUMANITIES DECANTED: Bhaskar Sarkar, “No Man’s (Is)land: Ecology of a Border”

February 22, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Join us for a dialogue between Bhaskar Sarkar (Film and Media Studies) and Lisa Sun-Hee Park (Asian American Studies) about Sarkar’s new article, “No Man’s (Is)land: Ecology of a Border.” Refreshments will be served. Focusing on a stretch of the international border between Bangladesh and India that coincides with the river Ganges, Sarkar’s new article examines the ambiguous productivities of proliferating borders in the era of globalization. In this overpopulated region of South Asia, the Farakka barrage has compounded problems of riverbank erosion, causing the loss of arable lands and homes. When displaced communities move to the silt islands—chars— that emerge in the middle of the river, they pose a problem for both states: are they citizens or foreigners? Analyzing a documentary film about the char people, Sarkar explores contemporary documentary’s engagement with border ecologies and migrant communities, state policies…

Find out more »

Crossings + Boundaries Talk: Exodus: The Largest Movement of People Since the Second World War
Dexter Filkins

February 28, 2018 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Corwin Pavilion, 494 UCEN Rd

The world is witnessing the greatest mass migration since 1945. More than sixty-five million people, about one in every hundred on Earth, have fled their homes. Some are internally displaced; others are refugees who have moved to multiple countries. This talk will discuss the three main causes of this giant human tide: the implosion of the Middle East following the Arab Spring; climate change, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, where drought and advancing deserts are pushing people to abandon their homes; and famine, because of which at least twenty million people are currently at risk of starvation, most of them in Nigeria, South Sudan, Yemen, and Somalia. In his talk, Filkins will take the audience on a tour of these places and discuss ways to address the complex causes of mass migration. Filkins has been a staff writer with The New Yorker since…

Find out more »
May 2018

Crossings + Boundaries TALKS: Sinan Antoon and Sara Pursley
Sinan Antoon and Sara Pursley

May 10, 2018 @ 1:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Talk: The Times of Revolution in Jawad Salim’s Monument to Freedom The Iraqi artist Jawad Salim’s famous Monument to Freedom, which still stands in Baghdad’s Liberation Square, is usually read as a linear historical narrative of the Iraqi nationalist movement and the 1958 revolution it produced. Pursley’s talk explores heterogeneous conceptions of time in the work, including depictions of cyclical forms of temporality that reference Khaldunian historical time, Shi`i messianic time, and the time of mourning. She suggests that these forms of time do not work against promises of radical change in the monument, but, on the contrary, give such promises more imaginative purchase than they typically achieve in linear modernization narratives, with their tendency to open onto a singular and static future. Sara Pursley is Assistant Professor in Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies at New York University. Talk: Pre-occupation, Epistemic Violence,…

Find out more »

HUMANITIES DECANTED: Lal Zimman, Transgender Language Reform: Some Challenges and Strategies for Promoting Trans-Affirming, Gender-Inclusive Language

May 17, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Join us for a presentation and discussion with Lal Zimman (Linguistics) about his new work, “Transgender Language Reform.” Refreshments will be served. With a growing societal interest in the experiences of transgender people has come a new kind of awareness about gendered language. Zimman’s recent article, “Transgender language reform: some challenges and strategies for promoting trans-affirming, gender-inclusive language,” takes a linguistic approach to trans-inclusive language by distilling the practices of transgender speakers of English into a series of challenges and potential solutions. A short presentation of his work will be followed by an audience discussion of practical strategies for trans-affirming and gender-inclusive language in the university context. Lal Zimman is Assistant Professor of Linguistics at UC Santa Barbara. His research takes a broad perspective on trans language, from voices to narratives to terminological choices. His edited volume, Queer Excursions: Retheorizing…

Find out more »
+ Export Events